Tag Archives: Victor Khabie MD

Protecting Football Players from Concussions and Other Injuries

Posted on: March 15, 2016

Football season is still months away, but concussion concerns in the sport are in the headlines year round.

Northern Westchester concussion treatmentRecently, a new study found that tackling methods that protect the head may be increasing the risk of leg injuries. However, the findings don’t reveal an actual link—just an association. And there may be other explanations for this unsettling news.

In the study, researchers at the University of Iowa in Iowa city tracked NCAA football-related concussions and other injuries for five years. During the period of the study, teams were instituting new protocols and rules that encouraged leading with the shoulders rather than the head, protecting defenseless receivers, and banning horse collar tackles (in which a player is pulled down by the shoulder pads at the neck).

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NAVIO robot-assisted partial knee replacement

Posted on: September 3, 2015

Amazing New Mobility after Advanced NAVIO Partial Knee Replacement Surgery

By Dr. Victor Khabie

Recently, advanced NAVIO robot-assisted partial knee replacement surgery was performed for iStock_18235142_RET3_HiRezthe first time in New York State at Northern Westchester Hospital. The technology uses sophisticated computer modeling that lets the surgeon create a unique, individualized surgical plan and then simulate that plan prior to surgery. The result is a transformation of partial knee replacement surgery – a great leap forward in precision and accuracy. The result for patients? A remarkable new option that restores natural movement as never before possible.

When painful and debilitating arthritis of the knee limits a person’s day-to-day activities, and all non-surgical measures have failed, the person is a candidate for knee replacement surgery. When it affects the whole knee, surgeons perform a full knee replacement. But when arthritis affects only part of the knee, most surgeons still perform a full knee replacement because until now, a partial replacement was a difficult and imprecise procedure. So much so that up to 30 percent of people getting a full knee replacement are actually candidates for a partial knee replacement.

Partial knee replacement requires that the implant synchronize perfectly with the remaining healthy portion of the knee, leaving almost zero leeway for surgical error. If the surgeon miscalculates by even a few millimeters in removing bone to make way for the implant, it will not fit properly. However, when successful, a partial knee replacement offers dramatic advantages, especially to those who enjoy an active lifestyle. The healthy parts of a person’s own knee are preserved, and the knee retains a more natural feel. Typically, the patient remains fully active. Why tear down the whole house just to renovate one room?

 unheard-of mobility post-surgery

Now, thanks to the precision of robot-assisted partial knee replacement surgery, that is no longer necessary. The breakthrough technology offers suitable candidates a viable alternative to a full knee replacement, and makes possible unheard-of mobility post-surgery. This leading-edge technology can provide patients suffering from arthritic pain another 10 to 15 years of an active lifestyle. What’s more, within just a few weeks of surgery, many patients are back to skiing, swimming, golfing, even playing tennis.

How does robot-assisted partial knee replacement surgery achieve
unprecedented results?

The NAVIO technology lets the surgeon do something entirely new in a partial knee replacement operation: remove only the diseased section of bone. The remaining cavity is then fitted with a metal insert that replaces the section of removed bone.

The surgeon starts by brushing a wand containing GPS coordinates over the arthritic section of the knee, thus feeding a 3-D image into the computer system. The computer registers the alignment of the entire limb, from ankle to hip, and how the whole leg moves together. The model shows every feature of a person’s leg – it’s as unique as a fingerprint. Now the surgeon can plan how much bone to remove for the implant and actually test the plan on the computer before beginning the surgery. The computer provides answers to key questions: If I remove this much bone, will the knee fully extend?  Will the knee feel natural — not too tight or too loose?

The technology ensures the accuracy needed for truly successful partial knee replacement.

Once perfected, the plan is coded into the handheld instrument used by the surgeon to perform the operation.  To help ensure safety, the device only permits movements in accordance with the plan – any deviation from the plan and the tools freeze, preventing the removal of any excess bone. The technology ensures the accuracy needed for truly successful partial knee replacement.

Robot-assisted partial knee replacement surgery offers a great new option to many age groups. It lets active people continue to engage in more strenuous sports than they could following a full knee replacement, which limits flexion. They can do anything that involves deep knee bending — rock climb, ski, cycle, hike, play tennis. The new approach also benefits those who may have other medical issues. This is a much smaller operation than a full knee replacement, offering a quicker, easier recovery, and a far lower rate of complications. It is the ideal procedure for those with some arthritic pain and limitation, but who do not want to sacrifice ligaments or remove healthy parts of the knee. By saving as much of a person’s own bone and ligaments as possible, NAVIO surgery lets them remain active for many years.

Editor’s Note: Victor Khabie. MD, FAAOS, FACS is Chief of the Department of Surgical Services, Co-Chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Co-Director of the Orthopedic and Spine Institute and Director of Sports Medicine, at Northern Westchester Hospital.

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Likely treatment and rehab that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will Face

Posted on: June 2, 2015

The Road Ahead: What Treatment and Rehab Options Might Look Like for Secretary Kerry

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of the Department of Surgery and Chief of Sports Medicine at

new york orthopedist, orthopedic surgeon westchester

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of the Department of Surgical Services, Co-Chief of Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Co-Director of the Orthopedic & Spine Institute and Director of the Sports Medicine Section, Northern Westchester Hospital

Northern Westchester Hospital in Hospital in Mount Kisco, NY explains the likely treatment and physical rehabilitation that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will receive after breaking his right femur in a bicycling accident.

Dr. Khabie says, “While it might take a full year for Secretary Kerry to completely heal, with advances in surgical procedures, he should be up and walking with crutches the same day as the surgery to repair his broken leg.”

Options to fix the femur
“While there are two options, it really only comes down to one option, and that is surgery. The other option would be to remain bedridden for six weeks as the broken bone heals, but that is not a good idea. People can develop bed sores, blood clots, and even pneumonia if they stay in bed that long. This should be fixed surgically by stabilizing the bone with a rod, plates, or screws, depending on the pattern of the fracture,” says Dr. Khabie.

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Manny Pacquiao, Punching Power and the Rotator Cuff

Posted on: May 8, 2015

Manny Pacquiao, Punching Power and the Role of the Rotator Cuff

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of the Department of Surgical Services, Co-Chief of Orthopedics and Sports Medicine, Co-Director of the Orthopedic and Spine Institute and Director of Sports Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, NY dispenses advice on rotator cuff surgery in light of professional boxer Manny Pacquiao’s shoulder injury.

When Dr. Khabie is not performing orthopedic surgery, he is a Ring Side Physician for the New York State Athletic Commission where he cares for professional boxers and has been present at ringside for numerous world championship bouts.

Dr. Khabie says, “I will be very difficult to box at a high level with a rotator cuff tear. The rotator cuff is critical in generating the punching power that boxers require to fight effectively. I believe that his injury significantly influenced the outcome of the recent high-profile fight against Floyd Mayweather.”

He adds, “The good news is that rotator cuff surgery is generally a very successful operation but can take one year to fully heal. A rematch in one year may be of interest to fight fans as Pacquiao would be at full force and would probably make a more competitive opponent. Mayweather will want to prove that he can beat Pacquiao when Pacquiao is back at full force and injury free.”

A lot of people, not just professional athletes, tear the rotator cuff in their shoulders. Dr. Khabie shares his thoughts on the signs of an injury, and what to expect when having rotator cuff surgery.

Signs of a rotator cuff injury

“If an individual has pain in their shoulder for more than seven days, experiences pain in their shoulder while he or she is trying to sleep at night, or has trouble lifting their arm above their head, it is time to see an orthopedic surgeon to see what is going on.”

Dr. Khabie adds that, “If someone sustains an injury while engaging physical activity, or a heavy object falls on the shoulder, he or she should have it looked at by an orthopedic surgeon to get to the bottom of the injury sustained.”

Can this surgery be avoided?

“Sometimes,” says Dr. Khabie. “If there isn’t in fact  a tear, physical therapy can often help along with exercises at home using an exercise band.”

Why would someone have the surgery?

“When a rotator cuff tears, it is no longer connected to the bone in the shoulder, called the humerus. It can only be reattached with surgery,” says Dr. Khabie.

How long is the hospital stay?

“Rotator cuff surgery patients go home the same day as the procedure. We operate on our patients arthroscopically, meaning we use only tiny incisions, which is much less invasive and speeds up the recovery time,” says Dr. Khabie.

What is the recovery like?

“Patients spend about four to six weeks with their arm in a sling. It takes several months to recover. After six months, most people are cleared to begin normal physical activity and exercise, or in the case of a professional athlete, they can begin training,” says Dr. Khabie. “After nine months, most patients feel back to normal.”

Editor’s Note:
Dr. Victor Khabie, MD, FAAOS, FACS is a member of the Somers Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Group. Dr. Khabie received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and completed his fellowship in sports medicine at the world-renowned Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles, California, where he served as assistant team physician to professional sports teams including the LA Lakers, Dodgers, Kings, Mighty Ducks, LA Sparks, and the USC Trojan football team.

Watch Dr. Khabie discuss the role of sports medicine in keeping athletes in competitive condition.

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Detroit Tiger Victor Martinez’ Torn Meniscus

Posted on: February 6, 2015

By Dr. Victor Khabie

I recently spoke with Jason Beck, a writer for MLB.com about Detroit Tiger Victor Martinez’ torn meniscus.

new york orthopedist, orthopedic surgeon westchester

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of  Department of Surgical Services, Co-Chief of Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Co-Director of  the Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital

A torn meniscus is one of the three most common sports-related knee injuries. Made of cartilage, the meniscus is the knee’s “shock absorber,” and a tear causes pain and dysfunction. Another common knee injury is to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a key ligament stabilizing the knee. And lastly, a torn medial collateral ligament (MCL), which keeps the tibia (shinbone) in place, usually consists of a partial tear.

There are two types of surgeries that can be done to repair a torn meniscus: The first, a partial meniscectomy which is a minor surgery where a small piece of the meniscus is clipped. The average recovery time for this procedure is four to six weeks. The other option would be reattachment surgery, which is more complex and recovery could take months.

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