Tag Archives: Orthopedic surgeon westchester

3-D Patient-Customized Total Knee Replacement Can Change Your Life

Posted on: March 31, 2017

If you have severe arthritis of the knee, you’re probably aware of total knee replacement surgery. Now discover how a dramatically modernized approach to this procedure offers you outstanding advantages in accuracy of fit, surgical safety and natural-feeling results. Read on and get empowered to recover your mobility – and your quality of life. By Dr. David Yasgur, Director of Quality and Outcomes at Northern Westchester Hospital’s Orthopedic & Spine Institute.

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Cervical Stenosis: Symptoms and Effective Treatments

Posted on: January 24, 2017

It may start as a slight clumsiness in picking up a coin or a subtle numbness in one hand. But that could signal the start of a serious problem that doesn’t originate in the hand at all, but rather in the cervical (neck) spine. In this post, I help you understand the condition called cervical stenosis and give you the good news about effective treatments. By Marshal D. Peris, MD, FAAOS, Co-Director, Spine Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital

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Detroit Tiger Victor Martinez’ Torn Meniscus

Posted on: February 6, 2015

By Dr. Victor Khabie

I recently spoke with Jason Beck, a writer for MLB.com about Detroit Tiger Victor Martinez’ torn meniscus.

new york orthopedist, orthopedic surgeon westchester

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of  Department of Surgical Services, Co-Chief of Orthopedics & Sports Medicine, Co-Director of  the Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital

A torn meniscus is one of the three most common sports-related knee injuries. Made of cartilage, the meniscus is the knee’s “shock absorber,” and a tear causes pain and dysfunction. Another common knee injury is to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a key ligament stabilizing the knee. And lastly, a torn medial collateral ligament (MCL), which keeps the tibia (shinbone) in place, usually consists of a partial tear.

There are two types of surgeries that can be done to repair a torn meniscus: The first, a partial meniscectomy which is a minor surgery where a small piece of the meniscus is clipped. The average recovery time for this procedure is four to six weeks. The other option would be reattachment surgery, which is more complex and recovery could take months.

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New York Spine Surgeon describes the O-Arm CAT Scanner

Posted on: December 19, 2013

Meet the O-Arm:  New technology in the OR

By John Abrahams, MD, FAANS, Chief of Neurosurgery, Co-Director of Spine Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute

Dr. John Abrahams Northern Westchester HospitalThe Orthopedic & Spine Institute of Northern Westchester Hospital recently brought new technology into the operating room – the O-Arm from Medtronic.

The O-Arm is an intra-operative CAT Scanner with Image Guidance used to make placement of spinal instrumentation more accurate and safer. 

Typically, the O-Arm would be mainly used for patients undergoing spine surgery that need instrumentation placed such as rods and screws.  During these procedures, patients are put to sleep with general anesthesia and prepped for surgery.  An incision is made over the surgical site and then the O-Arm is brought in to obtain a CAT Scan with three-dimensional imaging.

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New York Orthopedic Specialist Discusses Ankle Sprains

Posted on: June 24, 2013

The Pain of Ankle Sprains

By – Dr. Kurt Voellmicke, Director of Foot and Ankle Surgery for the Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital.

foot-swarm As a doctor I find that it is common for many to be confused over what constitutes a sprained ankle.  What is a sprain, and what should you do if you have one? You’ll be happy to know that the answers are pretty straightforward.

The Definition

A sprain is defined as a stretched or torn ligament — the tough, fibrous tissue that connects one bone to another and supports your joints. By far the most common type of sprain is in the ankle.  Typically people roll their ankle outward and damage the ligaments on the outside of the ankle. Basketball and volleyball players are the most susceptible to sprains, followed by soccer and lacrosse players. Jumping and then landing unevenly or on the side of another player’s foot is the typical cause of a sprain.  Ankle sprains can also occur sliding into a base or running on an uneven surface. Having high arches can put you at higher risk of a sprain: The foot is like a tripod. The higher one’s arch, the more the tripod tends to tilt to the side.  Other risk factors include weakness of the supporting leg muscles or poor balance.

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