Tag Archives: Orthopedic and spine institute

3-D Patient-Customized Total Knee Replacement Can Change Your Life

Posted on: March 31, 2017

If you have severe arthritis of the knee, you’re probably aware of total knee replacement surgery. Now discover how a dramatically modernized approach to this procedure offers you outstanding advantages in accuracy of fit, surgical safety and natural-feeling results. Read on and get empowered to recover your mobility – and your quality of life. By Dr. David Yasgur, Director of Quality and Outcomes at Northern Westchester Hospital’s Orthopedic & Spine Institute.

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Getting a Leg Up on Sciatica

Posted on: January 31, 2017

You get up from bed or turn to speak to someone — and sudden burning pain shoots down one leg. There’s a good chance you may have sciatica, a condition diagnosed approximately three million times a year in America, and caused by a specific type of injury to the sciatic nerve. Here, I inform you about sciatica’s causes, sciatica symptoms and remarkably high rates of recovery. By John Abrahams, MD, FAANS, Chief of Neurosurgery and Co-Director of Spine Surgery at the Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital (NWH).

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Cervical Stenosis: Symptoms and Effective Treatments

Posted on: January 24, 2017

It may start as a slight clumsiness in picking up a coin or a subtle numbness in one hand. But that could signal the start of a serious problem that doesn’t originate in the hand at all, but rather in the cervical (neck) spine. In this post, I help you understand the condition called cervical stenosis and give you the good news about effective treatments. By Marshal D. Peris, MD, FAAOS, Co-Director, Spine Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital

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Neurosurgeon Sheds Light on Former President Jimmy Carter’s Cancer Diagnosis

Posted on: August 27, 2015

Neurosurgeon Sheds Light on Former President Jimmy Carter’s Cancer Diagnosis

By Dr. Ezriel Kornel

Former President Jimmy Carter recently received his first radiation treatment targeting four Kornel, (Ezriel Kornel, MD)spots of melanoma on his brain.

Many people have only heard of melanoma on the skin. However, melanoma has a high rate of metastasizing to the central nervous system, including the brain and spinal cord. In the case of a single metastasis, surgical removal is typically an option. In the case of Jimmy Carter, he has multiple melanoma spots on his brain, and is being treated with radiation.

At Northern Westchester Hospital, we treat many of our brain cancer patients with radiation using a Gamma Knife. Not to be confused with an actual knife or incision, it is a large helmet-shaped device which the patient slides into after having a head-frame placed under brief sedation.  It delivers high doses of radiation in one sitting that lasts  from a half hour to a couple of hours.

The primary goal of this procedure is to stop the cancer from growing, and it has a very high success rate – more than 90% – with minimal if any side effects. It is very successful in that it is so precise that it does not damage surrounding areas in the brain.

While I’m not treating Jimmy Carter, I would say that at the age of 90, if he has no new cancerous lesions elsewhere, he can continue to maintain his current schedule and activities. And if there are new lesions discovered in the future in his brain, he can repeat his radiation treatments.

The melanoma, itself, presents risks. Some patients experience seizures or neurologic symptoms such as balance issues. And melanoma has tendencies to bleed, which can have devastating neurologic consequences.

The good news is that melanoma is to a large extent preventable. Avoiding excessive exposure to sunlight is important, and wearing sunscreen is always imperative with prolonged sun exposure. If you see any questionable spots on your skin, or spots that change, make an appointment with your primary care physician or dermatologist as soon as possible. Like many cancers, if melanoma is caught early, it is treatable.

Editor’s Note: Ezriel Kornel, MD, FACS, is a Neurosurgeon and Director of Neurosciences at The Orthopedic and Spine Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital. 

Read additional blog posts about the gamma knife, melanoma and sun safety.

New York Spine Surgeon describes the O-Arm CAT Scanner

Posted on: December 19, 2013

Meet the O-Arm:  New technology in the OR

By John Abrahams, MD, FAANS, Chief of Neurosurgery, Co-Director of Spine Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute

Dr. John Abrahams Northern Westchester HospitalThe Orthopedic & Spine Institute of Northern Westchester Hospital recently brought new technology into the operating room – the O-Arm from Medtronic.

The O-Arm is an intra-operative CAT Scanner with Image Guidance used to make placement of spinal instrumentation more accurate and safer. 

Typically, the O-Arm would be mainly used for patients undergoing spine surgery that need instrumentation placed such as rods and screws.  During these procedures, patients are put to sleep with general anesthesia and prepped for surgery.  An incision is made over the surgical site and then the O-Arm is brought in to obtain a CAT Scan with three-dimensional imaging.

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