Tag Archives: Mt Kisco hospital

Full-service hospital in Mt. Kisco New York

New York Respiratory Therapist Discusses Smoking Cessation

Posted on: September 20, 2013

2013 Is the Year to Finally Stop Smoking

by Jennifer Lucas RRT-NPS, Coordinator of Smoking Cessation Program, Respiratory Therapist, Northern Westchester Hospital

iStock_0245060_HiRezYes, it feels like we’ve heard it before: Smoking kills. But did you realize puffing a cigarette accounts for one of every five deaths in the United States? According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), more people die from smoking than from HIV, illegal drugs, alcohol abuse, car accidents, suicides, and murders combined. Continue reading

TwitterFacebookShare |

Westchester Hospital Dietitian Discusses Healthy Lunches for Back to School

Posted on: August 25, 2013

Packing A Healthy Lunchbag

by Stephanie Perruzza, MS, RD, CDN, Northern Westchester Hospital

lunch

September is back-to-school month …getting organized around books, supplies and first day back-to-school outfits, etc., etc…  We want to make this one task easier:  Packing the lunch bag.

You know that with a healthy meal, your child gets the energy s/he needs to make it through the day and thrive.  A healthy lunch can allow your child perform and study well, be more attentive in class and even maintain a healthy weight.  Save these tips below and your child will keep that healthy lunch rather than ditch it or swap it for a bag of chips or soda: Continue reading

New York Hospital Gastroenterologist Discusses Celiac Disease

Posted on: August 15, 2013

Sensitive to Gluten or Suffering from Celiac Disease?

by Dr. Elie Abemayor MD, Chief of Gastroenterology, Northern Westchester Hospital. 

iStock_108746606_HiRezJust 10 years ago, Americans with celiac (SEE-lee-ak) disease had a tough time getting a diagnosis. Doctors thought that the autoimmune digestive disorder was extremely rare in this country. However, recent studies suggest that at least 1 percent of the US population—about 3.5 million—may have this genetic condition, which causes symptoms like bloating, abdominal pain, and diarrhea and can lead to malnutrition and thinning bones. Even worse: Up to 83 percent of them don’t realize they have it, according to statistics from the National Foundation for Celiac Awareness. People used to think that celiac disease was primarily a problem in Northern Europe, now we know that we’re pretty much comparable. Continue reading

New York Pulmonary Specialist Discusses Asthma

Posted on: June 20, 2013

Are Asthma Attacks Rising With the Temperature This Summer?

By Dr. Harlan Weinberg, Medical Director of Pulmonary Medicine, Northern Westchester Hospital

Asthma If it seems like asthma is on the rise, it is. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention report that doctors diagnosed 4.3 million more Americans with the condition over the last ten years. Unfortunately, no one really knows why asthma is increasing. In spring and summer, the increase in temperature, pollen, and humidity can make asthma attacks more likely. Luckily, there are plenty of ways to protect yourself or loved ones.

Asthma is characterized by inflammation in the airways. This inflammation can lead to shortness of breath, a tight feeling in the chest, and wheezing. The condition can limit your ability to exercise or partake in activities of daily living. The inflammation can be caused by a number of triggers, such as allergies, dust mites, pollen, infections, certain foods, and environmental factors like pollution or mold. The full list is substantial, which means it may take a while to find a patient’s trigger. Blood tests for allergies can help narrow down the candidates. Patients may also want to keep a journal to jot down the places and times when breathing gets worse. Continue reading

New York Prostate Screening, Cancer, and Your PSA

Posted on: June 12, 2013

Prostate Cancer: When Should Men Get Screened?

by Josh Fink, MD

In the last few years, the advice on prostate cancer screening has been very confusing for patients, and front of mind for internists and urologists. It’s a pressing concern because in 2012 there were 28,000 deaths from prostate cancer. However, the best approach to screening is still controversial.

In 2009 and 2012, researchers published key trials on prostate cancer screening, and the results only added to the controversy. A large study done in the United States failed to find a benefit to early prostate cancer detection, whereas a large European study did. However, when I say the European study “did” find a benefit, it wasn’t that reassuring. According to a February issue of the Annals of Internal Medicine, the European study found that for every 1,000 men screened, 37 cases of cancer would need to be detected and treated to prevent one death. Continue reading