Tag Archives: Kimberly Stein RD

Safe Satisfying Seafood

Posted on: September 18, 2014

Savory and Satisfying Seafood

by Kimberly Stein, RD, CDN

There are plenty of fish (and shellfish) in the sea, but sometimes it’s difficult to know which are the best choices. Seafood is a delicious protein source that is rich in omega-3 fatty acids that boost heart and brain health. The current recommendation from the 2010 Dietary Guidelines is to consume seafood about 2 to 3 times per week. A recent hot topic is sustainable seafood. There are many environmental groups that identify which fish are the safest for consumption, and for the environment. The Monterey Bay Aquarium is one of those groups. To make their list, seafood must contain low levels of contaminants (such as mercury), high levels of omega-3 fats, and be sourced from a sustainable fishery.
Here are some simple tips to ensure you are getting safe, fresh, and nutritious seafood!

1)    Be Finicky When Selecting Fish. According to the Monterey Bay Aquarium, and their strict criteria, here are some of the best choices of seafood: Arctic Char (farmed), clams, mussels, oysters, Pacific Cod, Alaskan Salmon, Tilapia (Ecuador or US), and US/ Canada Albacore/white canned Tuna. They recommend avoiding: imported Mahi Mahi, farmed Atlantic Salmon, Shark, imported Swordfish, and Bluefin Tuna. As you can see, it also depends on where the fish comes from. Some waters are better than others, which will provide you with fewer toxins. For a more complete list of sustainable seafood, check out www.seafoodwatch.org

2)    Oh my Omega! Fish are a fantastic source of omega-3 fatty acids. These unsaturated fats are found to lower levels of inflammation throughout the body and reduce your risk of cardiovascular events. Certain fish with a higher fat content are higher in omega-3 fats, such as salmon, trout, herring, sardines, and tuna. Enjoy these to reap their heart-healthy benefits!

3)    Safely Cooking Seafood. As with all meats, the USDA sets requirements for how fish and shellfish should be properly cooked to avoid potential food-borne illness. Cook shrimp, lobster, and scallops until they are an opaque, milky white color. Fish should be cooked to an internal temperature of 145°F, until it flakes with a fork.

4)    Restaurant Ratings. To avoid the high-calorie seafood options when eating out, opt for dishes without a batter-dipped coating, or butter sauce. Instead of the coconut shrimp, try grilled shrimp or instead of a breading and mayo-rich crab cake, choose steamed crab legs. You can still enjoy a variety of seafood without the added fat calories.

Here are some delicious seafood recipes to try! Enjoy!

Hoisin-Glazed Salmon Burgers with Pickled Cucumber
Courtesy of www.myrecipes.com

Ingredients
Serves 4
1/3 cup water
¼ cup cider vinegar
1 tsp. sugar
½ tsp. minced garlic
½ tsp. minced peeled fresh ginger
¼ tsp. crushed red pepper
24 thin English cucumber slices
½ cup panko breadcrumbs
1/3 cup thinly sliced green onions
2 tbsp. chopped fresh cilantro
1 tbsp. lower-sodium soy sauce
1 ½ tsp. grated peeled fresh ginger
1 tsp. grated lime rind
1 (1-pound) skinless wild fresh or frozen Alaskan salmon fillet, finely chopped
1 large egg white
1 ½ tsp. dark sesame oil
1 tbsp. hoisin sauce
4 (1 ½ ounce) hamburger buns with sesame seeds, toasted

Method
1. Combine the first 6 ingredients in a small saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove from heat and cucumber. Let stand 30 minutes. Drain
2. Combine panko and the next 7 ingredients (through egg white) in a bowl and stir well. Divide the mixture into 4 equal portions, gently shaping each into a 1/2 –inch thick patty. Press a nickel sized indentation into the center of each patty.
3. Heat a large cast-iron skillet over medium-high heat. Add sesame oil to pan. Add patties and cook for 3 minutes on each side or until desired degrees of doneness. Brush tops of patties evenly with hoisin and cook for 30 seconds.
4. Place 1 patty on bottom half of each bun and top each with 6 cucumber slices and top half of bun.

(Nutrition Facts: Serving Size ¼ of recipe, Calories 324, Protein 29.4g, Fat 8.6g, Sat Fat 1.5g, Mono 2.3g, Carbohydrates 59g, Fiber 1.7g, Sodium 473 mg, Cholesterol 59mg)

Fish Tacos with Sesame Ginger Slaw
Courtesy of www.foodnetwork.com

Ingredients  
Serves 4
1 ½ lbs. tilapia fillets
Cooking spray
¼ tsp. salt
¼ tsp. pepper
3 tbsp. plain Greek-style low-fat yogurt
2 tbsp. lime juice
1 tbsp. dark sesame oil
1 tbsp. low-sodium soy sauce
2 tsp. grated peeled fresh ginger
1 tsp. honey
3 cups shredded coleslaw mix
12 (6-inch) corn tortillas, warmed

Method
1. Heat a nonstick skillet or grill pan over medium heat. Spray fish with cooking spray and sprinkle with salt and pepper.
2. Add fish to pan and cook 10 – 12 minutes, turning once, until fish flakes easily with a fork.
3. Combine yogurt and next 5 ingredients (through honey) in a small bowl, stirring with a whisk. Combine dressing and coleslaw mix, tossing to coat.
4. Place 2 ounces fish in each tortilla. Top with coleslaw.

(Nutrition Facts: Serving Size ¼ of recipe, Calories 390, Protein 40g, Fat 9g, Sat Fat 2g, Mono 3g, Poly 3g, Carbohydrates 38g, Fiber 6g, Sodium 430 mg, Cholesterol 85mg)

TwitterFacebookShare |

Tips for Reducing Salt in Your Diet

Posted on: March 14, 2014

Spice it Up and Toss the Salt

Kimberly Stein, RD, CDN

In today’s food culture, most of us are consuming far too much sodium. The current recommendation for sodium according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is less than 2,300 milligrams per day. That’s equivalent to about the size of one teaspoon. The recommendation for African Americans, individuals age 51 and older and anyone with high blood pressure, diabetes, or kidney disease is no more than 1,500 milligrams each day.

Yes, it’s true that we do need sodium in our body for normal functions, such as maintaining blood pressure. However, it’s when our sodium intake skyrockets that it can become dangerous causing hypertension (high blood pressure), or fluid retention in people with certain medical conditions, but controlling the amount in your diet may be easier than you think. Here are some simple tips to keep your sodium intake in check: Continue reading

New York Dietician Helps Make Game Day Healthy

Posted on: January 20, 2014

Healthy Party Tips for the Big Game

By Kimberly Stein, RD, CDN

The Big Game is just around the corner, which means a day full of football, friends, family, and lots of food. Most of us are guilty of overindulging on game day and it can be easy for this feeding frenzy to ruin your New Year’s resolutions.

Luckily, there are some easy strategies for maintaining the healthy new you. Here are five simple tips for avoiding the excess calories during Sunday night’s game and feel great when you wake up Monday morning.

Continue reading