Tag Archives: Diabetes

Holiday Food Safety Tips: Don’t be a Germ Re-gifter

Posted on: December 12, 2016

Whether you’re a seasoned chef, a first-time dinner host, or simply bringing a dish to grandma’s house on New Year’s Eve, the holidays can shake up the nerves of even the most self-assured culinary geniuses. “How am I supposed to transport my dish? I hope it’s fully cooked…I hope Aunt Anne isn’t preparing the main course this year, I got so sick last year.” These are a few of the many thoughts that run through our minds during the holiday season. Feasting with family and friends is what holiday celebrations are all about. Try to keep your holiday festivities memorable in the right way this year. Follow these simple tips to keep you and your loved ones food-poisoning free. By Jackie Farrall, RD, CDN, Northern Westchester Hospital.

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Exercise & Obesity – Clearing the Barrier

Posted on: November 28, 2016

Losing weight is really hard – on that we can all agree. What people may not realize is that, for obese people, it’s nearly impossible. The National Weight Control Registry, a joint effort between Brown Medical School and the University of Colorado, is a decades-long effort to track successful weight loss in Americans. Researchers have analyzed the National Weight Control Registry’s participants who have lost more than 50 pounds and managed to keep it off for at least five years. The findings reveal that it takes a nearly superhuman effort to lose a significant amount of weight and keep it off. Here, I’ll discuss the ways you can be proactive in avoiding obesity and what to do when obesity has become a barrier that you can’t seem to break. By Mitchell Roslin MD, Director of the Bariatric Surgery Program at Northern Westchester Hospital

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Staying Healthy without a Fad Diet

Posted on: November 8, 2016

Adopting a healthy lifestyle and getting your weight under control is a goal for many. It is particularly important for those concerned with Type II diabetes prevention or self-management. With so many fad diet programs and books available to you, how do you choose the best one? You don’t have to. While low carb diets like Atkins, South Beach, and Dukan are widely accepted for weight loss – eating healthy and staying consistent is the key to diabetes prevention. Here, I’ll give you tips to maintain a healthy lifestyle without the drawbacks that may come with fad diet programs. By Jill Ashbey-Pejoves, MS, RD, CDN, CDE, Northern Westchester Hospital.

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A Frightful Evening for Health-Conscious Parents

Posted on: October 31, 2016

It’s the morning of October 31st and our tiny ghouls, goblins and ghosts are waiting in anticipation for the school day to be over so they can go door-to-door, collecting candy and sweets from countless neighboring homes. While many health-conscious parents dread the arrival of All Hallows Eve, there are ways to give children a healthy balance. Here, I will give you tips for a health conscious fright night – without resorting to the dreaded toothbrush giveaway. By Jackie Farrall, RD, CDN, Northern Westchester Hospital

Have your Mini-Frankenstein’s Eat before they Trick-or-Treat.
What child doesn’t want to quickly devour the bounty of sweet treats they worked so hard to gather? Studies show that eating a healthy meal, packed with fiber and protein, before trick-or-treating reduces a child’s temptation to overindulge in sweets as their tummies will already be full. This is a great way of controlling the amount of sugar your children are consuming throughout the evening.

Best Costume Award Goes to: Non-Sugary Treats
Animal crackers, granola bars, popcorn, or even mini pretzel bags are fun and healthy options for children this Halloween. While kids may find these healthy treats a bit boring on such a festive night, you can look for fun packaging that may dress up these options and make them more eye-catching and appealing! You can also try making homemade popcorn or nutritious muffins and letting your little one help package, or costume it, in a spookily-clad bag– instantly making homemade wholesome treats more fun and engaging!

Like Children, Monsters Need Moderation, too!
Limiting the size of trick-or-treat bags for children is a great tip to keep things moderately healthy on Halloween. Instead of giving your child a pillowcase – which can hold nearly 48 pounds of candy — choose a small gift bag, instead. Once the night is over and costumes are hung up, limit candy to 1-3 small pieces per day. The rest of the candy should remain out of sight out and out of mind. This will show kids that they can still enjoy a special treat without going overboard.

MUAH-HA-HA You’d Never Think These Halloween Treats Have Half the Sugar

Pumpkin Spice Kettle Corn Popcorn

pumpkin-spice-kettle-cornIngredients
1 Tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 Tsp of nutmeg
1/4 Tsp ground ginger
1/2 Tsp of coconut oil
1/2 cup of popcorn kernels
5 Tbsp of sugar
1/2 Tsp salt

Directions
In a small bowl, combine cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger, set aside. Melt the coconut oil in a medium pot over medium-low heat. Once melted, add popcorn kernels, sugar and salt, cover with a lid. Shake the pot every 3 seconds until a full 3 seconds elapse in between kernel pops. Pour the popcorn into a bowl. Sprinkle with spice mix, and toss. Let popcorn sit for 5 minutes, until the sugar coating turns from sticky to crunchy.

Recipe Courtesy of: Amy’s Healthy Baking 

Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Mini Muffins

chocolate-chip-pumpkin-mini-muffinsIngredients
2 cups of whole wheat flour
4 Tsp of ground cinnamon
1 ½ Tsp baking powder
1/2 Tsp baking soda
1/2 Tsp salt
1 Tbsp coconut oil (can use unsalted butter instead)
1 ½ Tsp of vanilla extract
4 Tsp of sugar
3/4 cup of pumpkin puree
1/2 cup Greek yogurt
1/2 cup nonfat milk
1/4 cup miniature chocolate chips

Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees and lightly coat 32 mini muffin cups with nonstick cooking spray. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cinnamon, baking powder and salt. In a separate bowl, whisk together coconut oil and sugar. Stir in pumpkin puree and Greek yogurt – mixing until smooth. Stir in flour and milk. Fold in 3 Tbsp of mini chocolate chips. Next, divide the batter between the prepared muffin cups and gently press the remaining chocolate chips into the tops. Bake for 12-15 minutes.

Recipe Courtesy of: Amy’s Healthy Baking

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The Key to Reversing Pre-Diabetes

Posted on: November 9, 2015

The Key to Reversing Pre-Diabetes

By Pat Talio

A diagnosis of pre-diabetes means that you are at high risk for developing diabetes, and without lifestyle changes are likely to be diagnosed with Type 2 diabetes within 10 years. Better nutrition and exercise may help you prevent or delay the diagnosis of Type 2 Diabetes.

The arrow image depicts the differences between the blood sugar level of someone without diabetes, someone considered pre-diabetic and diabetessomeone with diabetes. Pre-diabetes means your blood sugar is higher than normal but not yet high enough to be diagnosed with diabetes.  A diagnosis of pre-diabetes is a reason to slow down and examine what you are eating and how active you are. Research shows with an improvement in your diet and with an increase in activity, which results in weight loss and better nutrition, Type 2 diabetes can be prevented or delayed.

The Diabetes Care and Education practice group of the Academy of Nutrition and Dietetics suggest the following tips to reverse Pre-Diabetes:
1. Move more – take a walk after dinner, stand up while talking on the phone, walk to your coworkers desk rather than use e-mail, jog in place or stand and stretch during TV commercials. Move if you’ve been sitter for 30 minutes. Remember every step counts.
2. Water is the way to go – replace juice, soda and other sugary drinks with water.
3. Just say no – Politely refuse the extra serving at the family dinner and powdered donut from a co-worker. Friends and family often have good intentions, but practice saying “No thank you!” to stay on track.
4. Size matters – be mindful of your portion sizes. Keep your protein to 4-6 ounces; a serving of starchy food should be less than one cup, and vegetables should cover at least one-half of your plate.

Change is always difficult but it may be easier with the support of a partner so grab a family member or friend and work together to make healthy lifestyle choices a reality.

Editor’s Note: Pat Talio, MS, RDN, CDE, CDN is a registered dietitian at Northern Westchester hospital and is a diabetes educator.

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