Tag Archives: Amy Rosenfeld RD

Detox Diet

Posted on: January 12, 2016

Support Your Body’s Natural Ability to Detox

By Amy Rosenfeld, MS, RD, CDN

Often thought of as the “quick, easy solution” to shed the pounds, detoxes or cleanses are all iStock_8309428_MultiPhoto_Foodthe rage in the world of dieting. Health claims range from improved health, energy, and digestion to decreased inflammation and weight loss, and while many people start cleanse diets to “jump-start” weight loss or “rid the body of toxins,” extreme diets are neither effective nor safe.

The theory behind detoxing is to give the gastrointestinal cells time to rest and become stronger. Instead, extreme cleanses are linked with lack of energy, headaches, irritability, constipation, nutritional deficiencies, blood sugar control issues, gastrointestinal bacterial imbalances, electrolyte imbalances, and even cardiac issues.

Specific diets vary, but extreme detoxes and cleanses often limit dieters to drinking fruit and vegetables juices and/or eating raw fruits and vegetables for an extended amount of time. The average cleanse is 800-1,000 calories per day, less than half the average 2,000 calorie intake most people need. Severe calorie restriction causes the body to break down glucose stored in our muscles causing water loss. After a longer period of time, the body breaks down muscle from limited protein intake. This water and muscle loss results in temporary weight loss that is regained once the diet is over.

Luckily, our bodies have a natural “detox” system – our kidneys, gastrointestinal tract, and liver. If we feed ourselves natural, unprocessed, whole foods, our bodies will do the rest. Follow these steps to create your own cleansing diet and revive from within:

1) Drink plenty of water, at least eight 8oz glasses per day.
2) Eat a high-fiber diet, with unprocessed whole grains (brown rice, quinoa, oatmeal), beans, lentils, nuts and seeds.
3) Fill at least ½ your plate at every meal with fruits and vegetables. The more colorful, the grater the antioxidant intake.
4) Choose vegetarian, plant-based meals.
5) Limit alcohol. The American Heart Association recommends no more than 1 drink per day for women and 2 drinks per day for men. (1 drink = 12oz of beer, 1.5oz hard alcohol, 5oz of wine.)
6) Limit sugar to 150 calories per day. Check labels for any added sugars, especially those sneaky sources of sugar including yogurts!

Create a week of menus for yourself –by planning each meal and sticking to a routine you can break free from old habits and maximize the positive benefits of a truly cleansing diet.
Healthy “Detox” Recipes for Breakfast, Lunch and Dinner

Beet Berry Smoothie

Ingredients:
2 beets, peeled and quartered
2 carrots, peeled and cut into 1-inch pieces
3 c. strawberries
2 c. plain Greek Yogurt
2 c. water

Directions:
Blend all ingredients until smooth!

Nutrition Facts:
(serves 3)
148cal, 1g fat, 145mg sodium, 34.2g carbohydrates, 8g fiber, 4.6g protein

Quinoa and Winter Fruit Salad
Courtesy of Food and Wine Magazine

Ingredients:
1 1/3 c. quinoa (about 1/2 pound), rinsed
1 1/2 c. water
2 kumquats—halved, seeded and coarsely chopped
2 Tbsp coarsely chopped cilantro
1/4 c pure olive oil
2 1/2 Tbsp fresh lemon juice
1/2 tsp kosher salt
1 large Bosc pear—peeled, cored and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 medium cucumber—peeled, seeded and cut into 1/2-inch pieces
1 c. coarsely chopped stemmed watercress
Directions:
1. In a medium saucepan, combine the quinoa and water and bring to a boil. Simmer over low heat, stirring often, until just tender, about 12 minutes; the grains should be separate and intact. Drain the quinoa and let cool completely.
2. In a small bowl, combine the kumquats and cilantro with the olive oil, lemon juice and salt and let steep for 5 minutes.
3. In a large bowl, toss together the quinoa, pear and cucumber. Add the dressing and toss well. Add the watercress and toss again. Serve at once.
Nutrition Facts:
(serves 4-6)
210cal, 10.7g fat, 1.5g saturated fat, 203mg sodium, 24g carbohydrates, 3g fiber, 5.4g protein

Two Bean Soup with Kale
Courtesy of Cookinglight.com

Ingredients:
3 Tbsp olive oil
1 c. chopped onion
1/2 c. chopped carrot
1/2 c. chopped celery
1/2 tsp salt, divided
2 garlic cloves, minced
4 c. organic vegetable broth (such as Emeril’s), divided
7 c. stemmed, chopped kale (about 1 bunch)
2 (15-ounce) cans no-salt-added cannellini beans, rinsed, drained, and divided
1 (15-ounce) can no-salt-added black beans, rinsed and drained
1/2 tsp freshly ground black pepper
1 Tbsp red wine vinegar
1 tsp chopped fresh rosemary

Directions:
1. Heat a large Dutch oven over medium-high heat. Add olive oil to pan; swirl to coat.
2. Add onion, carrot, and celery, and sauté 6 minutes or until tender.
3. Stir in 1/4 teaspoon salt and garlic; cook 1 minute.
4. Stir in 3 cups vegetable broth and kale. Bring to a boil; cover, reduce heat, and simmer 3 minutes or until kale is crisp-tender.
5. Place half of cannellini beans and remaining 1 cup vegetable broth in a blender or food processor; process until smooth.
6. Add pureed bean mixture, remaining cannellini beans, black beans, and pepper to soup. Bring to a boil; reduce heat, and simmer 5 minutes.
7. Stir in remaining 1/4 teaspoon salt, vinegar, and rosemary.

Nutrition Facts:
(serves 6)
250 cal, 10.4 g fat, 1.4 g saturated fat, 11.8 g protein, 9.2 g fiber, 393 mg sodium

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The Clever Cook: Back to School Lunchbox Learning

Posted on: September 8, 2015

The Clever Cook: Back to School Lunchbox Learning

By Amy Rosenfeld

Getting in the back-to-school swing after a relaxing, stress-free summer might be difficult, but Banana Sunbutter Sushiit’s definitely doable. Here are some tips to get lunchbox organized:

1) Start a lunchbox meal planner and start a rotation. It may sound silly but taking the task of thinking of ideas out of your daily routine is a real time saver.
2) Get organized with great lunchbox materials. Stock up on a variety of portable containers, including many sizes for hot and cold packing.
3) Make recipes ahead and freeze. As much as you can do ahead of time, the better off you will be. One way to get started: make soups ahead and freeze in ice cube trays for easy defrosting.

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Organic, Natural, Local, Grass-fed: What does it all mean?

Posted on: July 20, 2015

Decoding Sustainable Foods

By Amy Rosenfeld

In our efforts to be healthy and mindful when choosing the foods we eat, we often come across many environmental food terms including local, grass-fed, organic, etc. But what do all these labels mean?

Fruit & Vegetable PlatterFood grown or raised in an ecologically and ethically responsible manner, where the environment is protected, human health safeguarded, animals are farmed humanely, and workers are treated fairly is called Sustainable Food.

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The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Posted on: June 22, 2015

The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Amy Rosenfeld, MS RD CDN

This 4th of July, celebrate our country’s independence with good health and a patriotic plate. American flagRed, white, and blue foods are superfoods: nutrition powerhouses packed full of rich antioxidants and phytonutrients.

Red fruits and vegetables like strawberries, tomatoes, and pomegranate, are full of phytonutrients, anthocyanins, flavonoid compounds; nutrients that reduce cancer by fighting free radicals and preventing oxidative damage to cells. Red fruits and veggies are particularly high in the phytochemical lycopene, shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

White foods often get a bad reputation but fresh white foods, such as daikon radish, turnips, jicama or pears, are packed with nutrients. The anthoxanthins in white foods can reduce inflammation of all kinds.  One of the most common anthoxanthins, quercetin, is linked with lowering the risk of heart disease and cancer, easing the symptoms of allergies, and helping with pain from arthritis.

Blue and purple fruits and vegetables like blueberries, beets, and eggplant, have rich doses of phytonutrients and flavonoids that lower your risk of heart disease. Flavonoids may also help improve memory with aging and prevent many cancers.

Try out these easy recipes for your 4th of July this year. These recipes are perfect for a party, cookout or relaxing picnic.
Grilled Chicken with Red & Blueberry Salsa 

(Adapted from All Through The Year Cheer)
(Yield:  4 servings)

Ingredients:
4 (6 oz) chicken breasts, pounded to even thickness
1 tbsp olive oil (for grilling the chicken)
½ tsp pepper
½ tsp salt
1 c fresh blueberries, chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, seed and diced
1/4 red onion, diced
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (optional)
3 TB fresh minced parsley
2 TB fresh minced mint
1 TB lemon juice

Directions:
1) In a bowl, stir together all ingredients for the salsa and refrigerate until ready to use (you can make this up to 1 day in advance but if you do so, I recommend waiting until right before you serve it to add the fresh minced herbs).
2) Lightly brush olive oil on both sides of the chicken breast, then season both sides with salt and pepper.  Grill the chicken until fully cooked (there should not be any pink).
3) Serve the grilled chicken topped with salsa.

https://allthroughtheyearcheer.wordpress.com/2010/06/25/grilled-chicken-with-red-blueberry-salsa/

Nutrition Facts: 278 calories, 12.2 g fat, 2.8 g saturated fat, 393 mg sodium, 7.7 g carbohydrates, 1.8 g fiber, 33.6 g protein
Cous-Cous & Fruit Salad

(Courtesy of Eatingwell.com)
(serves 4)

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
2 teaspoons finely chopped shallots
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 cups cooked whole-wheat couscous
1 cup chopped nectarine
1 cup mixed fresh berries, such as blueberries and raspberries
2 tablespoons toasted sliced almonds

Directions:
1. Whisk oil, orange juice, vinegar, shallots, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add cooked couscous, nectarines, berries and almonds; gently toss to combine.

Nutrition Facts: 259 calories; 9 g fat; 1 g sat; 40 g carbohydrates; 7 g protein; 7 g fiber; 146 mg sodium

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_red_white_and_blue_recipes?slide=15

 

Red, White and Blue Yogurt Popsicles

(Adapted from The View from Great Island)
Yield: 10 popsicles

Ingredients:
1 cup raspberries
1 cup blueberries
1 cup vanilla flavored Greek yogurt

Directions:
1. Using a small food processor, or blender, puree the raspberries until smooth. Set aside. Repeat for the blueberries.
2. Put your popsicle mold in the freezer and freeze till firm, at least an hour, or more.
3. Layer a little bit of the blueberry puree into the mold. Put in the freezer for 10-20 minutes until solid. Alternate with layers, putting in the freezer for 10 minutes in between each layer.
4. When done layering, insert the popsicle sticks. Make sure to get the stick a little bit into the frozen layer so they will stand straight. Put back into the freezer until solid.
5. Once filled and completely frozen solid, you can un-mold your pops. If the pops don’t come out of the mold easily, run the outside of the mold under hot water for a few seconds.

Nutrition Facts: 31 calories, 0.1 g fat, 8 mg sodium, 5.6 g carbohydrates, 1.1 g fiber, 2.3 g protein

http://theviewfromgreatisland.com/red-white-and-blueberry-popsicles/

 

 

Get More Fruits and Veggies into Your Diet

Posted on: June 19, 2015

The Clever Cook:
How to Pack More Fruits and Veggies into Your Cooking

Fruit & Vegetable PlatterHave a picky eater at home? Or maybe you just don’t like fruits and veggies? Here are some “eat the rainbow” ways of sneaking fruits and veggies into your diet, making sure you get all your daily vitamins and minerals.

Red

• Add fresh chopped tomatoes into your jarred tomato sauce.
• Bake with applesauce into your baked goods, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Add red grapes, sliced radishes, pomegranate seeds, or sliced strawberries onto your salads.
• Make a smoothie with beets.
• Puree red peppers and add them to your tomato soup or sauce.
• Make a salad dressing using pink grapefruit.
• Add red chilies into your cooking for spice.

Yellow/Orange

• Add sweet potato or butternut squash puree into cheese sauces such as for mac and cheese or morning oatmeal.
• Add carrot puree into tomato sauces.
• Add pumpkin puree or mashed bananas into your baked goods, French toast, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Have spaghetti squash instead of pasta. Here is how to cook a spaghetti squash: www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-spaghetti-squash-in-the-oven-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-178036
• Make a smoothie with carrots or pumpkin puree.
• Make homemade salad dressing with orange or lemon juice.
• Grill pineapple and peaches on the barbeque for dessert.

Green

• Add a handful of chopped greens into your eggs or on top of your pizza.
• Puree a handful of spinach leaves and mix into your tomato sauce. Just a little won’t change the color!
• Use butter or romaine lettuce instead of bread for sandwiches.
• Add chopped greens or herbs into chopped meat for burgers and meatballs.
• Make low-fat zucchini muffins or pancakes, try this recipe: www.skinnytaste.com/2011/07/low-fat-chocolate-chip-zucchini-bread.html
• Bake with avocado instead of butter or oil.
• Add some zucchini puree into your cheesy pasta dishes (such as lasagna).
• Make a green smoothie with kale or spinach and citrus fruits.

Blue/Purple

• Mix in purple cabbage into your salad, tacos or stir-fry.
• Switch to purple potatoes for your mashed and add in pureed purple cauliflower.
• Grill plums on the barbeque for a sweet dessert or side dish.
• Cook with red onion instead of white or yellow.
• Add blackberries, blueberries or figs to your salads.
• Add pureed eggplant into tomato sauce or soup.
• Try sautéing purple kale or make kale chips.