Category Archives: Nutrition

Tips for Reducing Salt in Your Diet

Posted on: March 14, 2014

Spice it Up and Toss the Salt

Kimberly Stein, RD, CDN

In today’s food culture, most of us are consuming far too much sodium. The current recommendation for sodium according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is less than 2,300 milligrams per day. That’s equivalent to about the size of one teaspoon. The recommendation for African Americans, individuals age 51 and older and anyone with high blood pressure, diabetes, or kidney disease is no more than 1,500 milligrams each day.

Yes, it’s true that we do need sodium in our body for normal functions, such as maintaining blood pressure. However, it’s when our sodium intake skyrockets that it can become dangerous causing hypertension (high blood pressure), or fluid retention in people with certain medical conditions, but controlling the amount in your diet may be easier than you think. Here are some simple tips to keep your sodium intake in check: Continue reading

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New York Dietitian Gives Tips on Healthy Snacking

Posted on: February 26, 2014

National Snack Food Month

by Stephanie Perruzza, MS, RD, CDN, Northern Westchester Hospital

89792455compr-nutrition monthYes, you read this title correctly. There is a National Snack Food Month, and it’s in February. Snack foods tend to get a bad rep with stereotypical offerings like chips, cookies and soda on frequent advertisements. The good news is that snacking can fit into a healthy diet and lifestyle – just be sure to keep these few tips in mind:

  1. Calorie Control – you don’t want to overdo it and have your snack turn into a meal. Portion your snacks out and keep them between 150-225 calories.
  2. Snack Wisely – Choose nutritious food choices (see our examples below) and don’t snack mindlessly. When your mind is preoccupied, you eat more; so sit down and focus on your meal and hunger/fullness feelings. Continue reading

Northern Westchester Hospital Dietician Discusses Low-Fiber Nutrition

Posted on: January 21, 2014

Low-Fiber Nutrition Therapy

By Stephanie Perruzza MS, RD, CDN, Northern Westchester Hospital

Can eating or avoiding certain foods make you feel better when you have diarrhea? By consuming the recommended foods below, you will be eating less fiber, fat, lactose, and sugars, which should help stop diarrhea and make you feel better.

Tips:
1. Limit foods and beverages that contain sugar, lactose, fructose, high-fructose corn syrup, and sorbitol.
2. Avoid beverages with caffeine.
3. Eat a small meal or snack every 3 or 4 hours.
4. Avoid spicy foods if they make symptoms worse.

Recommended Foods:
(NOTE: these recommendations are suitable for most people. However, if your symptoms get worse after eating a specific food, it is recommended to avoid that food until your symptoms resolve and you feel better)

Continue reading

New York Dietician Helps Make Game Day Healthy

Posted on: January 20, 2014

Healthy Party Tips for the Big Game

By Kimberly Stein, RD, CDN

The Big Game is just around the corner, which means a day full of football, friends, family, and lots of food. Most of us are guilty of overindulging on game day and it can be easy for this feeding frenzy to ruin your New Year’s resolutions.

Luckily, there are some easy strategies for maintaining the healthy new you. Here are five simple tips for avoiding the excess calories during Sunday night’s game and feel great when you wake up Monday morning.

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Northern Westchester Hospital Dietician Promotes Fiber

Posted on: January 17, 2014

Focus on Your Fiber

January is National Fiber Focus month, making it the perfect time to start the New Year off right by adding more fiber into your diet. The daily recommended intake for fiber is 25 grams/day for women and 38 grams/day for men, but most Americans fail to meet this requirement and only consume about 15 grams daily. Increasing your fiber intake can help aid in digestion, weight management, lowering cholesterol and improving insulin sensitivity.

There are two types of dietary fiber: soluble and insoluble. Soluble fiber dissolves in water forming a gel; while insoluble fiber stays intact and moves rather quickly through your gastrointestinal tract. Therefore, because soluble fibers move through the gastrointestinal tract slower they help keep you feeling full longer. Insoluble fibers speed up the movement of food and waste aiding in digestion and laxation (bowel movement).

5 Ways to Increase Fiber:
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