Category Archives: Nutrition

The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Posted on: June 22, 2015

The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Amy Rosenfeld, MS RD CDN

This 4th of July, celebrate our country’s independence with good health and a patriotic plate. American flagRed, white, and blue foods are superfoods: nutrition powerhouses packed full of rich antioxidants and phytonutrients.

Red fruits and vegetables like strawberries, tomatoes, and pomegranate, are full of phytonutrients, anthocyanins, flavonoid compounds; nutrients that reduce cancer by fighting free radicals and preventing oxidative damage to cells. Red fruits and veggies are particularly high in the phytochemical lycopene, shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

White foods often get a bad reputation but fresh white foods, such as daikon radish, turnips, jicama or pears, are packed with nutrients. The anthoxanthins in white foods can reduce inflammation of all kinds.  One of the most common anthoxanthins, quercetin, is linked with lowering the risk of heart disease and cancer, easing the symptoms of allergies, and helping with pain from arthritis.

Blue and purple fruits and vegetables like blueberries, beets, and eggplant, have rich doses of phytonutrients and flavonoids that lower your risk of heart disease. Flavonoids may also help improve memory with aging and prevent many cancers.

Try out these easy recipes for your 4th of July this year. These recipes are perfect for a party, cookout or relaxing picnic.
Grilled Chicken with Red & Blueberry Salsa 

(Adapted from All Through The Year Cheer)
(Yield:  4 servings)

Ingredients:
4 (6 oz) chicken breasts, pounded to even thickness
1 tbsp olive oil (for grilling the chicken)
½ tsp pepper
½ tsp salt
1 c fresh blueberries, chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, seed and diced
1/4 red onion, diced
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (optional)
3 TB fresh minced parsley
2 TB fresh minced mint
1 TB lemon juice

Directions:
1) In a bowl, stir together all ingredients for the salsa and refrigerate until ready to use (you can make this up to 1 day in advance but if you do so, I recommend waiting until right before you serve it to add the fresh minced herbs).
2) Lightly brush olive oil on both sides of the chicken breast, then season both sides with salt and pepper.  Grill the chicken until fully cooked (there should not be any pink).
3) Serve the grilled chicken topped with salsa.

https://allthroughtheyearcheer.wordpress.com/2010/06/25/grilled-chicken-with-red-blueberry-salsa/

Nutrition Facts: 278 calories, 12.2 g fat, 2.8 g saturated fat, 393 mg sodium, 7.7 g carbohydrates, 1.8 g fiber, 33.6 g protein
Cous-Cous & Fruit Salad

(Courtesy of Eatingwell.com)
(serves 4)

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
2 teaspoons finely chopped shallots
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 cups cooked whole-wheat couscous
1 cup chopped nectarine
1 cup mixed fresh berries, such as blueberries and raspberries
2 tablespoons toasted sliced almonds

Directions:
1. Whisk oil, orange juice, vinegar, shallots, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add cooked couscous, nectarines, berries and almonds; gently toss to combine.

Nutrition Facts: 259 calories; 9 g fat; 1 g sat; 40 g carbohydrates; 7 g protein; 7 g fiber; 146 mg sodium

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_red_white_and_blue_recipes?slide=15

 

Red, White and Blue Yogurt Popsicles

(Adapted from The View from Great Island)
Yield: 10 popsicles

Ingredients:
1 cup raspberries
1 cup blueberries
1 cup vanilla flavored Greek yogurt

Directions:
1. Using a small food processor, or blender, puree the raspberries until smooth. Set aside. Repeat for the blueberries.
2. Put your popsicle mold in the freezer and freeze till firm, at least an hour, or more.
3. Layer a little bit of the blueberry puree into the mold. Put in the freezer for 10-20 minutes until solid. Alternate with layers, putting in the freezer for 10 minutes in between each layer.
4. When done layering, insert the popsicle sticks. Make sure to get the stick a little bit into the frozen layer so they will stand straight. Put back into the freezer until solid.
5. Once filled and completely frozen solid, you can un-mold your pops. If the pops don’t come out of the mold easily, run the outside of the mold under hot water for a few seconds.

Nutrition Facts: 31 calories, 0.1 g fat, 8 mg sodium, 5.6 g carbohydrates, 1.1 g fiber, 2.3 g protein

http://theviewfromgreatisland.com/red-white-and-blueberry-popsicles/

 

 

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Get More Fruits and Veggies into Your Diet

Posted on: June 19, 2015

The Clever Cook:
How to Pack More Fruits and Veggies into Your Cooking

Fruit & Vegetable PlatterHave a picky eater at home? Or maybe you just don’t like fruits and veggies? Here are some “eat the rainbow” ways of sneaking fruits and veggies into your diet, making sure you get all your daily vitamins and minerals.

Red

• Add fresh chopped tomatoes into your jarred tomato sauce.
• Bake with applesauce into your baked goods, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Add red grapes, sliced radishes, pomegranate seeds, or sliced strawberries onto your salads.
• Make a smoothie with beets.
• Puree red peppers and add them to your tomato soup or sauce.
• Make a salad dressing using pink grapefruit.
• Add red chilies into your cooking for spice.

Yellow/Orange

• Add sweet potato or butternut squash puree into cheese sauces such as for mac and cheese or morning oatmeal.
• Add carrot puree into tomato sauces.
• Add pumpkin puree or mashed bananas into your baked goods, French toast, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Have spaghetti squash instead of pasta. Here is how to cook a spaghetti squash: www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-spaghetti-squash-in-the-oven-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-178036
• Make a smoothie with carrots or pumpkin puree.
• Make homemade salad dressing with orange or lemon juice.
• Grill pineapple and peaches on the barbeque for dessert.

Green

• Add a handful of chopped greens into your eggs or on top of your pizza.
• Puree a handful of spinach leaves and mix into your tomato sauce. Just a little won’t change the color!
• Use butter or romaine lettuce instead of bread for sandwiches.
• Add chopped greens or herbs into chopped meat for burgers and meatballs.
• Make low-fat zucchini muffins or pancakes, try this recipe: www.skinnytaste.com/2011/07/low-fat-chocolate-chip-zucchini-bread.html
• Bake with avocado instead of butter or oil.
• Add some zucchini puree into your cheesy pasta dishes (such as lasagna).
• Make a green smoothie with kale or spinach and citrus fruits.

Blue/Purple

• Mix in purple cabbage into your salad, tacos or stir-fry.
• Switch to purple potatoes for your mashed and add in pureed purple cauliflower.
• Grill plums on the barbeque for a sweet dessert or side dish.
• Cook with red onion instead of white or yellow.
• Add blackberries, blueberries or figs to your salads.
• Add pureed eggplant into tomato sauce or soup.
• Try sautéing purple kale or make kale chips.

Kidneys: What do they do and How to keep them healthy

Posted on: June 5, 2015

Kidneys: Your Built-in Detox System

By Dr. Martin Saltzman

Your kidneys are easy to ignore. They purr away filtering your blood, eliminating toxins and impurities, and they rarely complain. However, you don’t want to take these vital Kidneyorgans for granted. When a kidney infection or chronic disease progresses too far, your kidneys can sustain permanent damage. Should something go wrong with your kidneys, your life can change dramatically for the worse. In fact, 90,000 Americans die each year from kidney disease.

Among the many duties of these unassuming organs, topmost is removing waste from your bloodstream for elimination from the body. Each day they filter up to 150 quarts of blood, producing about one to two quarts of urine. They also help maintain the balance of water and electrolytes like sodium and potassium in your body. On top of that important work, the kidneys also generate hormones that help regulate blood pressure and make red blood cells.

Kidneys accomplish this valuable work through the use of roughly a million filtering units per kidney known as nephrons. This is why kidney specialists are known as nephrologists, and the field of kidney medicine is called nephrology. A number of systemic, or underlying, conditions such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease can damage nephrons. A family history of kidney disease, autoimmune diseases – which can cause nephritis or vasculitis – allergic reactions to drugs and kidney stones can also damage your kidneys and place them at higher risk of failure. Behaviors that can damage kidneys include smoking or relying too much on over-the-counter NSAID pain medications such as ibuprofen or naproxen. When kidneys begin to fail, waste products build up in the body leading to very serious health issues.

Unfortunately, early kidney disease is difficult to spot. There are rarely obvious symptoms, so it’s important to check with your primary care physician if you notice any small changes such as discoloration of—or a decrease in—urine, or any swelling that may be due to the retention of fluids. If you’re under doctor’s orders to take large doses of NSAIDs, your kidney function should be closely monitored. When kidney disease is suspected, your primary care physician will refer you to a nephrologist for consultation and evaluation. A thorough examination, blood tests, imaging studies, and occasionally a biopsy are tools used to help uncover the underlying cause, which will guide treatment. It is also necessary to determine the stage of kidney disease if it is present.

Many people with CKD (chronic kidney disease) remain stable or progress slowly if their underlying condition is caught early enough and treated. However, in some instances kidney disease does progress, for those cases, renal replacement therapy (RRT) is available in the form of dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis) or a transplant.

Preventing Kidney Disease
You can avoid trouble by making sure you control high blood pressure, or if you have diabetes, managing your blood sugar by being careful to take your medications. People at elevated risk due to chronic conditions like heart disease or diabetes should get blood tests and urine tests to screen for early kidney disease. Have a chat with your doctor about the health of your kidneys and whether it makes sense to have them tested. This organ is critical for life. You won’t regret it, especially if you’re able to catch any kidney damage early.

If you have chronic kidney disease, I strongly urge you to visit www.davita.com and find a FREE Kidney Smart® Class near you.

Be Kind to your Kidney’s
Maintaining a healthy weight, working with a renal dietitian and following a renal diet of kidney-friendly foods is vital for people with kidney disease. Try adding some of these to your diet each day and be sure to keep it colorful.*
Fruits & Vegetables
Apples
Blackberries
Blueberries
Cranberries
Garlic
Plums
Raspberries
Red bell peppers
Red cabbage
Red leaf lettuce
Strawberries
Herbs & Spices
Cinnamon
Curry powder
Oregano
Pepper
Turmeric
*Source: www.davita.com

Editor’s Note: Martin Saltzman, MD is Chief of the Division of Nephrology at Northern Westchester Hospital.

What are the Health Benefits of Vitamin D

Posted on: May 20, 2015

Get the Details on Vitamin D

By Agnes Lu

Adequate vitamin D is important to your overall health for several reasons. It is essential for Grilled salmon with lemon isolated on whitestrong bones as it helps the body absorb calcium. It’s also needed for muscle movement, necessary for your nervous system and important to your immune system. Recent research shows that vitamin D may be key to the prevention of a number of long-term health problems such as cancer, type II diabetes and hypertension.

 

How much vitamin D do I need?
The amount of vitamin D needed depends on your age:
Birth – 12 months:                       400 IU/day
Age 1 – 70:                                     600 IU/day
Age 71 and older:                         800 IU/day
Pregnant and breastfeeding:     600 IU/day

How do I get vitamin D?
You can absorb vitamin D in three ways: through the skin, from diet, and from supplements.

Your body can produce vitamin D when your skin is sufficiently exposed to direct sunlight; however, unless you live in the South or Southwest, you are unlikely to get enough sunlight throughout the winter for your body to produce adequate amounts of vitamin D. Keep in mind, the American Academy of Dermatology does not recommend getting vitamin D from unprotected exposure to sunlight – which can increase your risk for skin cancer. Individuals with dark skin will absorb sunlight less efficiently.

There are a few foods that naturally contain vitamin D, and Americans get most of their vitamin D from fortified foods: milk, cereal, orange juice, and yogurt. If you’re looking for the natural sources of vitamin D, it can be found in fatty fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel. In smaller amounts, it can be found in beef liver, cheese and egg yolks.

Am I at risk for vitamin D deficiency?
There are certain groups that have a higher risk of being vitamin D deficient:
• Breastfed infants
• Older adults
• Individuals with limited sun exposure
• Individuals with dark skin
• Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease and other conditions that cause fat malabsorption
If you think you might be vitamin D deficient, speak with your doctor.

Try these two salmon and egg dishes.

Lox, eggs and onions (Serves 4)

Modified from foodnetwork.com

Ingredients
1 large Spanish onion
1 tablespoons canola oil
3oz lox, chopped
8 eggs
Pinch of pepper

Directions
Cut the onion in half, then slice thinly. In a large saute pan, heat the oil over high heat, then saute the onions until lightly colored.
In a bowl, beat eggs with a fork, then add to the pan. When the eggs have set on the bottom, scramble in the lox and flip over.
Cook and scramble until just set.
Serve with fresh fruit or side salad for a complete breakfast or lunch.
Nutrition Facts (per serving): 220 calories, 14.1 g fat, 3.4 g saturated fat, 975 mg sodium, 4 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 19 g protein

 

Scandinavian Eggs Benedict with Yogurt Sauce

courtesy of Gooseberry Mooseberry http://www.gooseberrymooseberry.com/2012/04/scandinavian-eggs-benedict-with-yogurt.html
(Serves 2)

Ingredients
1 cup low-fat Greek yogurt
1/8 tsp powdered turmeric
1 Tbsp chopped fresh dill
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 tsp horseradish
A crackle of white pepper
2 whole wheat English muffins, halved and toasted
4 slices of smoked salmon
4 poached eggs
Optional: chopped chives for garnish

Directions
In a medium bowl, whisk together yogurt and turmeric until yogurt turns a pale gold color.
Then stir in dill, lemon juice, horseradish, and pepperuntil combined. Leave it at room temperature for a few minutes as you cook the eggs. If you would like the sauce warmer, put it in the microwave for about 30 seconds.
Top each toasted English muffin half with a slice of smoked salmon, a poached egg and a dollop of yogurt sauce. Sprinkle with chopped chives for garnish.
Serve with fresh fruit or side salad for a complete breakfast or lunch.
Nutrition Facts (per serving): 400 calories, 12 g total fat, 4 g saturated fat, 750 mg sodium, 51 g carbohydrates, 4.8 g fiber, 25 g protein

Editor’s Note: Agnes Lu, MS, RD, CDE, CDN

Healthy Snacks On-The-Go

Posted on: April 6, 2015

Nutritionist Approved:
Healthy snack products to look for on your next grocery trip

By Elisa Bremner, RD
This is the first edition of a series of nutritionist-approved food products on the market.

Snacks are an important and useful way to stave off hunger, bolster nutrient intake, keep energy up and satisfy the occasional craving (for emotional health!). But the best food is always the whole food. For snacks, I recommend fruit, vegetables and “mini meals” like a bowl of soup or ½ sandwich.

Processed, packaged food can fit into your balanced diet, but should never become the basis of your diet. Unfortunately, it’s just not possible for most of us to prepare fresh, whole-food snacks every time we get hungry. Practically speaking, when we’re running around all day, a packaged snack food may be the only option. We have choices. Here are five of my faves:

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