Category Archives: Northern Westchester Hospital News

Ready to Run

Posted on: July 22, 2015

Ready to Run: Simple Stretches to Stave Off Injury

By Dennis McGovern

Each year, more and more people are inspired to start their own running program. Running provides both physical and mental benefits, the only equipment required is a pair of Runningrunning shoes and you can do it anywhere. I’m a big fan of setting fitness goals, and recommend taking a few precautions to help avoid injury.

A thorough warm up before running is a must. When you do any type of vigorous exercise, you get microtears in your muscles. That’s natural—when your body repairs your muscles, they become stronger. But if you aren’t properly warmed up, you’ll experience many more of these tears and you’ll be much sorer afterward.

While most people think the proper warm up begins with stretching, few know that you need an active warm up to loosen your muscles and get blood flowing before you stretch. Otherwise you won’t get the full benefit of stretching. Try jogging-in-place, jumping jacks, and high-knee stepping for five to 10 minutes. Since running involves your full body, do some arm circles as well: Hold your arms out to your sides and start with small rotations forward and then backward; make progressively larger circles.

Once your muscles are sufficiently warm, the following leg stretches will complete your pre-run regimen and you’ll be ready to go. Hold each stretch for about 30 seconds, and repeat it two to three times. Despite what you may have heard, stretching should not be painful. You want to feel the stretch but it should be tolerable.

“Exercise doesn’t take as much effort when your
muscles are loose and ready for action.”

Hamstring stretch: Stand facing stairs and place the heel of your right leg on a step in front of you. Keeping your right knee straight, lean forward and reach toward your toe. Switch legs and repeat.

Quad stretch: Facing a wall, place your left hand on the wall for balance and then lift your right heel up behind you, bending your leg at the knee. Grasp your right ankle with your right hand and pull your heel toward your rear. You should feel a mild stretch in the front of your leg. Be sure not to lock the knee in the leg you are standing on. Switch legs and repeat.

Calf stretch: Stand about arm’s length from a wall, place your hands against the wall and step forward with your left foot. Now lean toward the wall keeping your body straight and your right heel on the ground. Push back through your right heel as you feel the stretch. Switch legs and repeat.

Forward lunge: Keeping your head up and trunk straight, step forward with your right leg into a lunge position. Sink your hips toward the ground. Lower your hips until both knees are bent at about a 90-degree angle. Make sure your front knee is directly above your ankle. Your other knee should not touch the floor. Then return to the starting position. (You may want to hold onto a chair or wall for balance.) Switch legs and repeat.

Piriformis stretch: This is especially important for women whose wider hips increase the angle to their knees and leave them susceptible to pain and tightness in this small muscle deep in the buttocks. Sitting in a chair, place your right ankle over your left knee and push down on your right knee while leaning forward. Switch legs and repeat.

IT Band stretch: This is the long flat ligament that runs along the outside of your thigh from your hip to the knee, and it can become very tight in runners. Stand in front of a wall and place your right foot behind and to the left of your left foot. Bend your upper body to the left, pushing your hips gently to the right until you feel the stretch in your right hip and outside of your thigh. Switch legs and repeat.

Exercise doesn’t take as much effort when your muscles are loose and ready for action, and by taking the time for a proper warm up, you’ll not only lessen your chances of injury, you’ll improve your running times.

Editor’s Note: Dennis McGovern, DPT, is a physical therapist at Northern Westchester Hospital’s Ambulatory Care Center at Chappaqua Crossing. Visit www.nwhrehab.org to learn more about Northern Westchester Hospital’s rehabilitation services.

Northern Westchester Hosptial is a proud sponsor of the Kisco 5K. Join us on september 20th for the 2nd Annual Mt. Kisco Race. Register today!

 

 

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The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Posted on: June 22, 2015

The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Amy Rosenfeld, MS RD CDN

This 4th of July, celebrate our country’s independence with good health and a patriotic plate. American flagRed, white, and blue foods are superfoods: nutrition powerhouses packed full of rich antioxidants and phytonutrients.

Red fruits and vegetables like strawberries, tomatoes, and pomegranate, are full of phytonutrients, anthocyanins, flavonoid compounds; nutrients that reduce cancer by fighting free radicals and preventing oxidative damage to cells. Red fruits and veggies are particularly high in the phytochemical lycopene, shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

White foods often get a bad reputation but fresh white foods, such as daikon radish, turnips, jicama or pears, are packed with nutrients. The anthoxanthins in white foods can reduce inflammation of all kinds.  One of the most common anthoxanthins, quercetin, is linked with lowering the risk of heart disease and cancer, easing the symptoms of allergies, and helping with pain from arthritis.

Blue and purple fruits and vegetables like blueberries, beets, and eggplant, have rich doses of phytonutrients and flavonoids that lower your risk of heart disease. Flavonoids may also help improve memory with aging and prevent many cancers.

Try out these easy recipes for your 4th of July this year. These recipes are perfect for a party, cookout or relaxing picnic.
Grilled Chicken with Red & Blueberry Salsa 

(Adapted from All Through The Year Cheer)
(Yield:  4 servings)

Ingredients:
4 (6 oz) chicken breasts, pounded to even thickness
1 tbsp olive oil (for grilling the chicken)
½ tsp pepper
½ tsp salt
1 c fresh blueberries, chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, seed and diced
1/4 red onion, diced
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (optional)
3 TB fresh minced parsley
2 TB fresh minced mint
1 TB lemon juice

Directions:
1) In a bowl, stir together all ingredients for the salsa and refrigerate until ready to use (you can make this up to 1 day in advance but if you do so, I recommend waiting until right before you serve it to add the fresh minced herbs).
2) Lightly brush olive oil on both sides of the chicken breast, then season both sides with salt and pepper.  Grill the chicken until fully cooked (there should not be any pink).
3) Serve the grilled chicken topped with salsa.

https://allthroughtheyearcheer.wordpress.com/2010/06/25/grilled-chicken-with-red-blueberry-salsa/

Nutrition Facts: 278 calories, 12.2 g fat, 2.8 g saturated fat, 393 mg sodium, 7.7 g carbohydrates, 1.8 g fiber, 33.6 g protein
Cous-Cous & Fruit Salad

(Courtesy of Eatingwell.com)
(serves 4)

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
2 teaspoons finely chopped shallots
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 cups cooked whole-wheat couscous
1 cup chopped nectarine
1 cup mixed fresh berries, such as blueberries and raspberries
2 tablespoons toasted sliced almonds

Directions:
1. Whisk oil, orange juice, vinegar, shallots, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add cooked couscous, nectarines, berries and almonds; gently toss to combine.

Nutrition Facts: 259 calories; 9 g fat; 1 g sat; 40 g carbohydrates; 7 g protein; 7 g fiber; 146 mg sodium

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_red_white_and_blue_recipes?slide=15

 

Red, White and Blue Yogurt Popsicles

(Adapted from The View from Great Island)
Yield: 10 popsicles

Ingredients:
1 cup raspberries
1 cup blueberries
1 cup vanilla flavored Greek yogurt

Directions:
1. Using a small food processor, or blender, puree the raspberries until smooth. Set aside. Repeat for the blueberries.
2. Put your popsicle mold in the freezer and freeze till firm, at least an hour, or more.
3. Layer a little bit of the blueberry puree into the mold. Put in the freezer for 10-20 minutes until solid. Alternate with layers, putting in the freezer for 10 minutes in between each layer.
4. When done layering, insert the popsicle sticks. Make sure to get the stick a little bit into the frozen layer so they will stand straight. Put back into the freezer until solid.
5. Once filled and completely frozen solid, you can un-mold your pops. If the pops don’t come out of the mold easily, run the outside of the mold under hot water for a few seconds.

Nutrition Facts: 31 calories, 0.1 g fat, 8 mg sodium, 5.6 g carbohydrates, 1.1 g fiber, 2.3 g protein

http://theviewfromgreatisland.com/red-white-and-blueberry-popsicles/

 

 

Kidneys: What do they do and How to keep them healthy

Posted on: June 5, 2015

Kidneys: Your Built-in Detox System

By Dr. Martin Saltzman

Your kidneys are easy to ignore. They purr away filtering your blood, eliminating toxins and impurities, and they rarely complain. However, you don’t want to take these vital Kidneyorgans for granted. When a kidney infection or chronic disease progresses too far, your kidneys can sustain permanent damage. Should something go wrong with your kidneys, your life can change dramatically for the worse. In fact, 90,000 Americans die each year from kidney disease.

Among the many duties of these unassuming organs, topmost is removing waste from your bloodstream for elimination from the body. Each day they filter up to 150 quarts of blood, producing about one to two quarts of urine. They also help maintain the balance of water and electrolytes like sodium and potassium in your body. On top of that important work, the kidneys also generate hormones that help regulate blood pressure and make red blood cells.

Kidneys accomplish this valuable work through the use of roughly a million filtering units per kidney known as nephrons. This is why kidney specialists are known as nephrologists, and the field of kidney medicine is called nephrology. A number of systemic, or underlying, conditions such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease can damage nephrons. A family history of kidney disease, autoimmune diseases – which can cause nephritis or vasculitis – allergic reactions to drugs and kidney stones can also damage your kidneys and place them at higher risk of failure. Behaviors that can damage kidneys include smoking or relying too much on over-the-counter NSAID pain medications such as ibuprofen or naproxen. When kidneys begin to fail, waste products build up in the body leading to very serious health issues.

Unfortunately, early kidney disease is difficult to spot. There are rarely obvious symptoms, so it’s important to check with your primary care physician if you notice any small changes such as discoloration of—or a decrease in—urine, or any swelling that may be due to the retention of fluids. If you’re under doctor’s orders to take large doses of NSAIDs, your kidney function should be closely monitored. When kidney disease is suspected, your primary care physician will refer you to a nephrologist for consultation and evaluation. A thorough examination, blood tests, imaging studies, and occasionally a biopsy are tools used to help uncover the underlying cause, which will guide treatment. It is also necessary to determine the stage of kidney disease if it is present.

Many people with CKD (chronic kidney disease) remain stable or progress slowly if their underlying condition is caught early enough and treated. However, in some instances kidney disease does progress, for those cases, renal replacement therapy (RRT) is available in the form of dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis) or a transplant.

Preventing Kidney Disease
You can avoid trouble by making sure you control high blood pressure, or if you have diabetes, managing your blood sugar by being careful to take your medications. People at elevated risk due to chronic conditions like heart disease or diabetes should get blood tests and urine tests to screen for early kidney disease. Have a chat with your doctor about the health of your kidneys and whether it makes sense to have them tested. This organ is critical for life. You won’t regret it, especially if you’re able to catch any kidney damage early.

If you have chronic kidney disease, I strongly urge you to visit www.davita.com and find a FREE Kidney Smart® Class near you.

Be Kind to your Kidney’s
Maintaining a healthy weight, working with a renal dietitian and following a renal diet of kidney-friendly foods is vital for people with kidney disease. Try adding some of these to your diet each day and be sure to keep it colorful.*
Fruits & Vegetables
Apples
Blackberries
Blueberries
Cranberries
Garlic
Plums
Raspberries
Red bell peppers
Red cabbage
Red leaf lettuce
Strawberries
Herbs & Spices
Cinnamon
Curry powder
Oregano
Pepper
Turmeric
*Source: www.davita.com

Editor’s Note: Martin Saltzman, MD is Chief of the Division of Nephrology at Northern Westchester Hospital.

Likely treatment and rehab that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will Face

Posted on: June 2, 2015

The Road Ahead: What Treatment and Rehab Options Might Look Like for Secretary Kerry

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of the Department of Surgery and Chief of Sports Medicine at

new york orthopedist, orthopedic surgeon westchester

Dr. Victor Khabie, Co-Chief of Orthopedic Surgery,  Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospitl

Northern Westchester Hospital in Hospital in Mount Kisco, NY explains the likely treatment and physical rehabilitation that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will receive after breaking his right femur in a bicycling accident.

Dr. Khabie says, “While it might take a full year for Secretary Kerry to completely heal, with advances in surgical procedures, he should be up and walking with crutches the same day as the surgery to repair his broken leg.”

Options to fix the femur
“While there are two options, it really only comes down to one option, and that is surgery. The other option would be to remain bedridden for six weeks as the broken bone heals, but that is not a good idea. People can develop bed sores, blood clots, and even pneumonia if they stay in bed that long. This should be fixed surgically by stabilizing the bone with a rod, plates, or screws, depending on the pattern of the fracture,” says Dr. Khabie.

How long will it take to heal?
Dr. Khabie says, “Typically, the broken bone will take six to eight weeks to heal, and a year for a full recovery.”

What is to be expected when it is time for physical rehabilitation?
“This injury will require months of physical rehabilitation,” says Dr. Khabie. “The muscles in the leg will atrophy, meaning they will wither and shrink in size. When the bone is healed, he will begin a more aggressive rehabilitation to include strength training. It’s a good thing he likes bicycling. He will start rehab using a stationary bike in about six weeks.”

Are there added concerns since Secretary Kerry had hip surgery on his right side as well?
“That previous surgery on his right hip makes this surgery more delicate,” says Dr. Khabie. “Care must be taken that the rods and screws used to fix his femur fracture do not interfere with his prior procedure. It is wise that he is having the same team of doctors perform both surgeries.”

Editor’s Note:
Dr. Victor Khabie, MD, FAAOS, FACS is a member of the Somers Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Group. Dr. Khabie received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and completed his fellowship in sports medicine at the world-renowned Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles, California, where he served as assistant team physician to professional sports teams including the LA Lakers, Dodgers, Kings, Mighty Ducks, LA Sparks, and the USC Trojan football team.

Mammograms: An Effective Tool in the Fight Against Breast Cancer

Posted on: May 13, 2015

Sandra Lee’s Diagnosis Has Many Women Asking: Should I Get a Mammogram?

Dr. Bonnie Litvack, Medical Director of the Women’s Imaging Center at Northern Westchester Hospital, answers questions many women have about when to start getting mammograms in light of the news that Food Network star and author Sandra Lee, who is Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s partner, has been diagnosed with breast cancer.

When should I start getting routine mammograms?
I, along with the American Cancer Society, recommend women start getting annual mammograms at the age of 40. I know there are differing opinions, but there is not a high incidence of breast cancer before the age of 40. There are some exceptions, of course, which I explain below.

What if I have a history of breast cancer in my family? Should I start getting mammograms earlier?
If you have a family history of breast cancer, whether it is your mother, aunt, or grandmother on either side of the family, you should start getting mammograms 10 years earlier than the age your family member was diagnosed. For example, if your mother was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 35, you should begin to get mammograms at age 25. However, 25 is the youngest age that I would recommend a woman get a mammogram. If your mother was diagnosed at age 30, I’d still recommend you begin getting mammograms at age 25.

What if I feel a lump in my breast?
Call your doctor and make an appointment. Your doctor will make recommendations about next steps, including getting a mammogram, if deemed necessary.

How long does a mammogram take, and does it hurt?
Typically a mammogram only takes a few minutes. While some patients experience some discomfort, they are in the minority, and if they feel any pain, we manage it.

What if I have no family history of breast cancer? Do I still need to get mammograms?
Absolutely. In fact, 75%-80% of breast cancer diagnoses are with women with no family history.

How effective are mammograms?
They are very effective. Since 1990, mammograms have helped decrease the death rate among breast cancer patients by 15%-40% depending on which studies you read. That is an impressive and encouraging number given that up until 1980, the death rate was steady. Mammograms are an incredibly effective tool to detect breast cancer early, or to rule it out.

Editor’s Note:
Under the leadership of Dr. Bonnie Litvak, the Women’s Imaging Center at Northern Westchester Hospital has been acclaimed as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiology. She is fellowship trained in MRI and has extensive experience in all aspects of women’s imaging, including mammography.

Northern Westchester Hospital also offers 3-D mammography.