Category Archives: Health News

Summer Safety for Tots, Teens and Beyond

Posted on: June 23, 2015

Summer Safety for Tots, Teens and Beyond

By Dr. Jim Dwyer

Pediatric emergencies occur year round, but certain conditions are much more common in boy drinking watersummer. Visits to the emergency department for trauma increase significantly in the summer months. When school ends, most children increase the amount of time spent playing outdoors and, as a result, we see numerous cases of broken bones, sprains, strains, lacerations and concussions.

Fortunately, life-threatening trauma is not a common presentation. Parents can help prevent injuries by making sure children wear the proper safety equipment like helmets when bicycling, along with wrist, elbow, and knee pads when inline skating or skateboarding. I recommend visiting www.safekids.org, which has useful tips on numerous child safety issues.

Ticks are a particular concern in Westchester and the surrounding areas. Tick-borne diseases such as lyme disease, babesiosis, and human granulocytic anaplasmosis (formerly known as ehrlichiosis) start showing up in the spring and peak in the summer months. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention recommend using repellents with DEET, checking your clothing for ticks and showering after being outdoors.

With the hot weather comes heat-related illness. ER visits for dehydration and heat exhaustion are common in the summer. Staying well-hydrated and avoiding prolonged exertion in the heat are key to avoiding heat related illness.

Many teens may be starting summer jobs this time of year. Teens who work outdoors should stay well hydrated and protect themselves from the sun by wearing sunscreen or keeping skin covered. If they begin to feel overheated, lightheaded, nauseous, or develop a headache or excessive sweating, its time to get indoors to an air-conditioned environment and rehydrate.

There’s a common summer sickness that many parents don’t know about: It comes from enteroviruses, which cause vomiting and diarrhea. Good handwashing is key to avoiding illness and infecting others. When swimming pools open up, pain from otitis externa, commonly known as swimmer’s ear, becomes a common reason for a visit to the emergency room. Conjunctivitis, or pink eye, may be caused by a viral or bacterial infection and can also occur due to an allergic reaction to irritants in the air, like pollen and smoke or chlorine in swimming pools.

However, the biggest concern with swimming pools is drowning. Never let children swim unattended. One of the greatest gifts a parent can give a child is to invest in swimming lessons. Aside from the safety benefit of helping to prevent drowning, lessons will help the child overcome the fear of the water and safely enjoy swimming for a lifetime.

A final piece of advice, NEVER leave a child unattended in a car for any length of time. The temperature inside a vehicle can rise so quickly that it can kill a child in as little as 15 minutes. Be mindful when there is a change in your morning routine or if you are distracted by other events in your life, because that’s when a moment’s inattention can turn into a life-threatening situation.

Despite the potential for injury, remember that summertime is one of the greatest times in a child’s life. Get those kids off the iPads and video games so they can safely enjoy some outdoor fun!

Editor’s Note: James Dwyer, MD is the Chief of Emergency Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital. Read more of Dr. Dwyer’s blog posts.

 

TwitterFacebookShare |

Get More Fruits and Veggies into Your Diet

Posted on: June 19, 2015

The Clever Cook:
How to Pack More Fruits and Veggies into Your Cooking

Fruit & Vegetable PlatterHave a picky eater at home? Or maybe you just don’t like fruits and veggies? Here are some “eat the rainbow” ways of sneaking fruits and veggies into your diet, making sure you get all your daily vitamins and minerals.

Red

• Add fresh chopped tomatoes into your jarred tomato sauce.
• Bake with applesauce into your baked goods, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Add red grapes, sliced radishes, pomegranate seeds, or sliced strawberries onto your salads.
• Make a smoothie with beets.
• Puree red peppers and add them to your tomato soup or sauce.
• Make a salad dressing using pink grapefruit.
• Add red chilies into your cooking for spice.

Yellow/Orange

• Add sweet potato or butternut squash puree into cheese sauces such as for mac and cheese or morning oatmeal.
• Add carrot puree into tomato sauces.
• Add pumpkin puree or mashed bananas into your baked goods, French toast, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Have spaghetti squash instead of pasta. Here is how to cook a spaghetti squash: www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-spaghetti-squash-in-the-oven-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-178036
• Make a smoothie with carrots or pumpkin puree.
• Make homemade salad dressing with orange or lemon juice.
• Grill pineapple and peaches on the barbeque for dessert.

Green

• Add a handful of chopped greens into your eggs or on top of your pizza.
• Puree a handful of spinach leaves and mix into your tomato sauce. Just a little won’t change the color!
• Use butter or romaine lettuce instead of bread for sandwiches.
• Add chopped greens or herbs into chopped meat for burgers and meatballs.
• Make low-fat zucchini muffins or pancakes, try this recipe: www.skinnytaste.com/2011/07/low-fat-chocolate-chip-zucchini-bread.html
• Bake with avocado instead of butter or oil.
• Add some zucchini puree into your cheesy pasta dishes (such as lasagna).
• Make a green smoothie with kale or spinach and citrus fruits.

Blue/Purple

• Mix in purple cabbage into your salad, tacos or stir-fry.
• Switch to purple potatoes for your mashed and add in pureed purple cauliflower.
• Grill plums on the barbeque for a sweet dessert or side dish.
• Cook with red onion instead of white or yellow.
• Add blackberries, blueberries or figs to your salads.
• Add pureed eggplant into tomato sauce or soup.
• Try sautéing purple kale or make kale chips.

Leg Injury After Hip Replacement Surgery

Posted on: June 19, 2015

Impact of Leg Injury After Hip Replacement Surgery

Dr. Eric Grossman details the impact of a leg injury following hip replacement surgery, in light of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s recent broken femur and subsequent surgery.

Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS; Co-Director, Joint Replacement Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute Northern Westchester Hospital

Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS; Co-Director, Joint Replacement Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital

As we’ve seen in the case of Secretary Kerry, if you fall or sustain a major accident, individuals can break the bone around a hip implant. Typically the implants of a hip replacement reside in the patient’s bone without compromising the bone’s strength. However when a fall or traumas strike the leg, the bone can still be vulnerable to breaking.

The location of the break also determines the impact on the hip implant. A fracture in the femur below or above the implant typically does not jeopardize the implant. Yet a fracture closer to or occurring around the implant could disrupt the implant’s fixation and therefore its stability. This will result in the need for a “re-do” or revision surgery where a new hip implant is placed. These procedures are typically performed by a Joint Replacement Specialist as they are more complex than first time hip replacements.

“Hip replacement patients should feel
optimistic about their future physical abilities.”

Secretary Kerry is a great example of how most hip replacement patients return to a high level of physical functionality. Whether it is a “normal” return to physical activity, or rigorous exercise, hip replacement patients should feel optimistic about their future physical abilities.

Editors Note: Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS is Co-Director of Joint Replacement Surgery at tge Orthopedic and Spine Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital. Dr. Grossman specializes in all aspects of hip and knee joint replacement surgery including primary and revision total joint replacement, with a focus on the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacement.  

Watch Dr. Grossman discuss the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacment and hear what several patients have to say about Dr. Grossman, the anterior approach and their experience at Northern Westchester Hospital, www.nwhorthoandspine.org/DrGrossman.

 

Kidneys: What do they do and How to keep them healthy

Posted on: June 5, 2015

Kidneys: Your Built-in Detox System

By Dr. Martin Saltzman

Your kidneys are easy to ignore. They purr away filtering your blood, eliminating toxins and impurities, and they rarely complain. However, you don’t want to take these vital Kidneyorgans for granted. When a kidney infection or chronic disease progresses too far, your kidneys can sustain permanent damage. Should something go wrong with your kidneys, your life can change dramatically for the worse. In fact, 90,000 Americans die each year from kidney disease.

Among the many duties of these unassuming organs, topmost is removing waste from your bloodstream for elimination from the body. Each day they filter up to 150 quarts of blood, producing about one to two quarts of urine. They also help maintain the balance of water and electrolytes like sodium and potassium in your body. On top of that important work, the kidneys also generate hormones that help regulate blood pressure and make red blood cells.

Kidneys accomplish this valuable work through the use of roughly a million filtering units per kidney known as nephrons. This is why kidney specialists are known as nephrologists, and the field of kidney medicine is called nephrology. A number of systemic, or underlying, conditions such as diabetes mellitus and cardiovascular disease can damage nephrons. A family history of kidney disease, autoimmune diseases – which can cause nephritis or vasculitis – allergic reactions to drugs and kidney stones can also damage your kidneys and place them at higher risk of failure. Behaviors that can damage kidneys include smoking or relying too much on over-the-counter NSAID pain medications such as ibuprofen or naproxen. When kidneys begin to fail, waste products build up in the body leading to very serious health issues.

Unfortunately, early kidney disease is difficult to spot. There are rarely obvious symptoms, so it’s important to check with your primary care physician if you notice any small changes such as discoloration of—or a decrease in—urine, or any swelling that may be due to the retention of fluids. If you’re under doctor’s orders to take large doses of NSAIDs, your kidney function should be closely monitored. When kidney disease is suspected, your primary care physician will refer you to a nephrologist for consultation and evaluation. A thorough examination, blood tests, imaging studies, and occasionally a biopsy are tools used to help uncover the underlying cause, which will guide treatment. It is also necessary to determine the stage of kidney disease if it is present.

Many people with CKD (chronic kidney disease) remain stable or progress slowly if their underlying condition is caught early enough and treated. However, in some instances kidney disease does progress, for those cases, renal replacement therapy (RRT) is available in the form of dialysis (hemodialysis and peritoneal dialysis) or a transplant.

Preventing Kidney Disease
You can avoid trouble by making sure you control high blood pressure, or if you have diabetes, managing your blood sugar by being careful to take your medications. People at elevated risk due to chronic conditions like heart disease or diabetes should get blood tests and urine tests to screen for early kidney disease. Have a chat with your doctor about the health of your kidneys and whether it makes sense to have them tested. This organ is critical for life. You won’t regret it, especially if you’re able to catch any kidney damage early.

If you have chronic kidney disease, I strongly urge you to visit www.davita.com and find a FREE Kidney Smart® Class near you.

Be Kind to your Kidney’s
Maintaining a healthy weight, working with a renal dietitian and following a renal diet of kidney-friendly foods is vital for people with kidney disease. Try adding some of these to your diet each day and be sure to keep it colorful.*
Fruits & Vegetables
Apples
Blackberries
Blueberries
Cranberries
Garlic
Plums
Raspberries
Red bell peppers
Red cabbage
Red leaf lettuce
Strawberries
Herbs & Spices
Cinnamon
Curry powder
Oregano
Pepper
Turmeric
*Source: www.davita.com

Editor’s Note: Martin Saltzman, MD is Chief of the Division of Nephrology at Northern Westchester Hospital.

Likely treatment and rehab that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will Face

Posted on: June 2, 2015

The Road Ahead: What Treatment and Rehab Options Might Look Like for Secretary Kerry

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of the Department of Surgery and Chief of Sports Medicine at

new york orthopedist, orthopedic surgeon westchester

Dr. Victor Khabie, Co-Chief of Orthopedic Surgery,  Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospitl

Northern Westchester Hospital in Hospital in Mount Kisco, NY explains the likely treatment and physical rehabilitation that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will receive after breaking his right femur in a bicycling accident.

Dr. Khabie says, “While it might take a full year for Secretary Kerry to completely heal, with advances in surgical procedures, he should be up and walking with crutches the same day as the surgery to repair his broken leg.”

Options to fix the femur
“While there are two options, it really only comes down to one option, and that is surgery. The other option would be to remain bedridden for six weeks as the broken bone heals, but that is not a good idea. People can develop bed sores, blood clots, and even pneumonia if they stay in bed that long. This should be fixed surgically by stabilizing the bone with a rod, plates, or screws, depending on the pattern of the fracture,” says Dr. Khabie.

How long will it take to heal?
Dr. Khabie says, “Typically, the broken bone will take six to eight weeks to heal, and a year for a full recovery.”

What is to be expected when it is time for physical rehabilitation?
“This injury will require months of physical rehabilitation,” says Dr. Khabie. “The muscles in the leg will atrophy, meaning they will wither and shrink in size. When the bone is healed, he will begin a more aggressive rehabilitation to include strength training. It’s a good thing he likes bicycling. He will start rehab using a stationary bike in about six weeks.”

Are there added concerns since Secretary Kerry had hip surgery on his right side as well?
“That previous surgery on his right hip makes this surgery more delicate,” says Dr. Khabie. “Care must be taken that the rods and screws used to fix his femur fracture do not interfere with his prior procedure. It is wise that he is having the same team of doctors perform both surgeries.”

Editor’s Note:
Dr. Victor Khabie, MD, FAAOS, FACS is a member of the Somers Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Group. Dr. Khabie received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and completed his fellowship in sports medicine at the world-renowned Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles, California, where he served as assistant team physician to professional sports teams including the LA Lakers, Dodgers, Kings, Mighty Ducks, LA Sparks, and the USC Trojan football team.