Category Archives: Health News

Infectious Diseases Expert Explains Legionnaires’ Outbreak in the Bronx

Posted on: July 30, 2015

Infectious Diseases Expert Explains Legionnaires’ Disease

By Dr. Debra Spicehandler

With reports of cases of Legionnaires’ disease cases rising to 31 in the South Bronx, individuals should know the symptoms, and that it is treatable. I have seen one case at Northern Westchester Hopsital this month. Legionnaires’ disease is not rare. In fact, it is one of the most common causes of pneumonia. However, it can be treated with antibiotics including Erythromycin, Zithromax, or Levaquin.

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Surprising Findings for Infants at Risk for Peanut Allergies

Posted on: July 29, 2015

Does early introduction of peanut products reduce the incidence of peanut allergy?

By Dr. Craig Osleeb

Creamy Peanut Butter with PeanutsPeanut allergy is a major problem. It is currently one of the 6 most common causes of food allergy in childhood. The prevalence of peanut allergy has risen over the past decade and currently affects approximately 1.4% of the USA population. While many children will outgrow their food allergy to milk, egg, wheat and soy, 82% of those allergic to peanut will remain so for life. This is a great concern to parents, patient’s and the healthcare community at large. In February of this year the New England Journal of Medicine published a prospective placebo blinded study (Learning Early about Peanut Allergy, LEAP, study) that has far reaching implications for the prevention of peanut allergy.

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Summer Safety for Tots, Teens and Beyond

Posted on: June 23, 2015

Summer Safety for Tots, Teens and Beyond

By Dr. Jim Dwyer

Pediatric emergencies occur year round, but certain conditions are much more common in boy drinking watersummer. Visits to the emergency department for trauma increase significantly in the summer months. When school ends, most children increase the amount of time spent playing outdoors and, as a result, we see numerous cases of broken bones, sprains, strains, lacerations and concussions.

Fortunately, life-threatening trauma is not a common presentation. Parents can help prevent injuries by making sure children wear the proper safety equipment like helmets when bicycling, along with wrist, elbow, and knee pads when inline skating or skateboarding.

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Get More Fruits and Veggies into Your Diet

Posted on: June 19, 2015

The Clever Cook:
How to Pack More Fruits and Veggies into Your Cooking

Fruit & Vegetable PlatterHave a picky eater at home? Or maybe you just don’t like fruits and veggies? Here are some “eat the rainbow” ways of sneaking fruits and veggies into your diet, making sure you get all your daily vitamins and minerals.

Red

• Add fresh chopped tomatoes into your jarred tomato sauce.
• Bake with applesauce into your baked goods, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Add red grapes, sliced radishes, pomegranate seeds, or sliced strawberries onto your salads.
• Make a smoothie with beets.
• Puree red peppers and add them to your tomato soup or sauce.
• Make a salad dressing using pink grapefruit.
• Add red chilies into your cooking for spice.

Yellow/Orange

• Add sweet potato or butternut squash puree into cheese sauces such as for mac and cheese or morning oatmeal.
• Add carrot puree into tomato sauces.
• Add pumpkin puree or mashed bananas into your baked goods, French toast, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Have spaghetti squash instead of pasta. Here is how to cook a spaghetti squash: www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-spaghetti-squash-in-the-oven-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-178036
• Make a smoothie with carrots or pumpkin puree.
• Make homemade salad dressing with orange or lemon juice.
• Grill pineapple and peaches on the barbeque for dessert.

Green

• Add a handful of chopped greens into your eggs or on top of your pizza.
• Puree a handful of spinach leaves and mix into your tomato sauce. Just a little won’t change the color!
• Use butter or romaine lettuce instead of bread for sandwiches.
• Add chopped greens or herbs into chopped meat for burgers and meatballs.
• Make low-fat zucchini muffins or pancakes, try this recipe: www.skinnytaste.com/2011/07/low-fat-chocolate-chip-zucchini-bread.html
• Bake with avocado instead of butter or oil.
• Add some zucchini puree into your cheesy pasta dishes (such as lasagna).
• Make a green smoothie with kale or spinach and citrus fruits.

Blue/Purple

• Mix in purple cabbage into your salad, tacos or stir-fry.
• Switch to purple potatoes for your mashed and add in pureed purple cauliflower.
• Grill plums on the barbeque for a sweet dessert or side dish.
• Cook with red onion instead of white or yellow.
• Add blackberries, blueberries or figs to your salads.
• Add pureed eggplant into tomato sauce or soup.
• Try sautéing purple kale or make kale chips.

Leg Injury After Hip Replacement Surgery

Posted on: June 19, 2015

Impact of Leg Injury After Hip Replacement Surgery

Dr. Eric Grossman details the impact of a leg injury following hip replacement surgery, in light of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s recent broken femur and subsequent surgery.

Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS; Co-Director, Joint Replacement Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute Northern Westchester Hospital

Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS; Co-Director, Joint Replacement Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital

As we’ve seen in the case of Secretary Kerry, if you fall or sustain a major accident, individuals can break the bone around a hip implant. Typically the implants of a hip replacement reside in the patient’s bone without compromising the bone’s strength. However when a fall or traumas strike the leg, the bone can still be vulnerable to breaking.

The location of the break also determines the impact on the hip implant. A fracture in the femur below or above the implant typically does not jeopardize the implant. Yet a fracture closer to or occurring around the implant could disrupt the implant’s fixation and therefore its stability. This will result in the need for a “re-do” or revision surgery where a new hip implant is placed. These procedures are typically performed by a Joint Replacement Specialist as they are more complex than first time hip replacements.

“Hip replacement patients should feel
optimistic about their future physical abilities.”

Secretary Kerry is a great example of how most hip replacement patients return to a high level of physical functionality. Whether it is a “normal” return to physical activity, or rigorous exercise, hip replacement patients should feel optimistic about their future physical abilities.

Editors Note: Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS is Co-Director of Joint Replacement Surgery at tge Orthopedic and Spine Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital. Dr. Grossman specializes in all aspects of hip and knee joint replacement surgery including primary and revision total joint replacement, with a focus on the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacement.  

Watch Dr. Grossman discuss the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacment and hear what several patients have to say about Dr. Grossman, the anterior approach and their experience at Northern Westchester Hospital, www.nwhorthoandspine.org/DrGrossman.