Category Archives: Rehab

Leg Injury After Hip Replacement Surgery

Posted on: June 19, 2015

Impact of Leg Injury After Hip Replacement Surgery

Dr. Eric Grossman details the impact of a leg injury following hip replacement surgery, in light of U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry’s recent broken femur and subsequent surgery.

Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS; Co-Director, Joint Replacement Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute Northern Westchester Hospital

Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS; Co-Director, Joint Replacement Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospital

As we’ve seen in the case of Secretary Kerry, if you fall or sustain a major accident, individuals can break the bone around a hip implant. Typically the implants of a hip replacement reside in the patient’s bone without compromising the bone’s strength. However when a fall or traumas strike the leg, the bone can still be vulnerable to breaking.

The location of the break also determines the impact on the hip implant. A fracture in the femur below or above the implant typically does not jeopardize the implant. Yet a fracture closer to or occurring around the implant could disrupt the implant’s fixation and therefore its stability. This will result in the need for a “re-do” or revision surgery where a new hip implant is placed. These procedures are typically performed by a Joint Replacement Specialist as they are more complex than first time hip replacements.

“Hip replacement patients should feel
optimistic about their future physical abilities.”

Secretary Kerry is a great example of how most hip replacement patients return to a high level of physical functionality. Whether it is a “normal” return to physical activity, or rigorous exercise, hip replacement patients should feel optimistic about their future physical abilities.

Editors Note: Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS is Co-Director of Joint Replacement Surgery at tge Orthopedic and Spine Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital. Dr. Grossman specializes in all aspects of hip and knee joint replacement surgery including primary and revision total joint replacement, with a focus on the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacement.  

Watch Dr. Grossman discuss the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacment and hear what several patients have to say about Dr. Grossman, the anterior approach and their experience at Northern Westchester Hospital, www.nwhorthoandspine.org/DrGrossman.

 

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Likely treatment and rehab that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will Face

Posted on: June 2, 2015

The Road Ahead: What Treatment and Rehab Options Might Look Like for Secretary Kerry

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of the Department of Surgery and Chief of Sports Medicine at

new york orthopedist, orthopedic surgeon westchester

Dr. Victor Khabie, Co-Chief of Orthopedic Surgery,  Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospitl

Northern Westchester Hospital in Hospital in Mount Kisco, NY explains the likely treatment and physical rehabilitation that U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry will receive after breaking his right femur in a bicycling accident.

Dr. Khabie says, “While it might take a full year for Secretary Kerry to completely heal, with advances in surgical procedures, he should be up and walking with crutches the same day as the surgery to repair his broken leg.”

Options to fix the femur
“While there are two options, it really only comes down to one option, and that is surgery. The other option would be to remain bedridden for six weeks as the broken bone heals, but that is not a good idea. People can develop bed sores, blood clots, and even pneumonia if they stay in bed that long. This should be fixed surgically by stabilizing the bone with a rod, plates, or screws, depending on the pattern of the fracture,” says Dr. Khabie.

How long will it take to heal?
Dr. Khabie says, “Typically, the broken bone will take six to eight weeks to heal, and a year for a full recovery.”

What is to be expected when it is time for physical rehabilitation?
“This injury will require months of physical rehabilitation,” says Dr. Khabie. “The muscles in the leg will atrophy, meaning they will wither and shrink in size. When the bone is healed, he will begin a more aggressive rehabilitation to include strength training. It’s a good thing he likes bicycling. He will start rehab using a stationary bike in about six weeks.”

Are there added concerns since Secretary Kerry had hip surgery on his right side as well?
“That previous surgery on his right hip makes this surgery more delicate,” says Dr. Khabie. “Care must be taken that the rods and screws used to fix his femur fracture do not interfere with his prior procedure. It is wise that he is having the same team of doctors perform both surgeries.”

Editor’s Note:
Dr. Victor Khabie, MD, FAAOS, FACS is a member of the Somers Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Group. Dr. Khabie received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and completed his fellowship in sports medicine at the world-renowned Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles, California, where he served as assistant team physician to professional sports teams including the LA Lakers, Dodgers, Kings, Mighty Ducks, LA Sparks, and the USC Trojan football team.

Pulmonary Rehab and Quality of Life

Posted on: April 1, 2015

Pulmonary Rehab Can Improve Quality of Life

By Harlan R. Weinberg

Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is increasingly recognized as a significant part of treatment for Human respiratory system, artworkpeople with chronic respiratory illnesses and other lung conditions. Even for those with very impaired lung function, this specialized rehab can improve quality of life and the ability to live independently. Here, I explain how PR offers new hope to people with breathing difficulties.

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Warm Up Before You Run

Posted on: October 30, 2014

GETTING READY FOR A RUN?

by Dennis McGovern

Running FeetWith the New York City Marathon upon us, lots of people will be inspired to start their own running program. I love the idea of setting ambitious fitness goals, but you’ll want to take some precautions to avoid injury.

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Sports Medicine Expert on Concussion Symptoms and Dangers

Posted on: October 14, 2014

Concussion Management. Assessing the Symptoms.

By Dr. Eric Small

While a headache is among the best-known and first symptoms of a concussion, there are often delayed symptoms that indicate ongoing mild brain damage and require treatment. Ten percent of symptoms don’t present for a week or more.

For this reason, it is essential that parents and teachers as well as emergency room physicians and pediatricians recognize the need to monitor a young injured athlete for the full spectrum of possible symptoms. In my experience, when the athlete gets over the initial headache, or perhaps never experiences this symptom, parents and youngster often push for a quick return to all activities. But that can put a young person at serious risk.

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