Category Archives: Pediatrics

Northern Westchester Hospital Chief of Pediatrics Discusses New Vaccination Requirements in New York

Posted on: July 22, 2014

Back-to-School Preparations May Need to Include Vaccinations
By Dr. Pete Richel

Your child may need a new vaccination before classes start this fall. For the first time in more than a decade, New York State has updated its school immunization requirements, and now children must be vaccinated twice against varicella—chicken pox.

Image courtesy of Sura Nualpradid / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Sura Nualpradid / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Prior to July of this year, parents could opt out of the second chicken pox vaccine. Why the shift? After all, many adults may remember chicken pox parties from their youth: Mothers would take children to visit a sick kid so that their children would be exposed, get ill, and gain immunity. Although chicken pox can be relatively mild, it can also cause permanent scarring and in some cases turn deadly. As recently as 10 years ago—before use of the vaccine was widespread—the US had as many as 100 deaths a year from chicken pox. From a public health perspective and from mine as a doctor, one death is too many. If we can eliminate this risk, we should seize that opportunity.

There have been some other minor changes to the immunization requirements, such as stipulating a schedule of three to five polio vaccinations before starting school. This has to do with timing. If your child has received the required three polio vaccines in infancy, they must still receive one at the time of school entrance. Three are required, and four are recommended for complete immunization. In either case, one must be received between the ages of 4 and 6. The new requirements—which will be phased in over the next seven years—apply to students starting daycare, Head Start, nursery, pre-kindergarten, and grades kindergarten through 12. If you’ve already taken your children for their wellness visit and vaccinations—or you’re not sure if your child is vaccinated against chicken pox—contact your pediatrician.

Editor’s Note: Dr. Peter Richel, MD, FAAP is Chief of Pediatrics at Northern Westchester Hospital.

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Chief of Emergency Medicine on Summer Safety

Posted on: July 10, 2014

Summer Safety Tips

By Dr. Jim Dwyer

Young Family Parents and Boy Son CyclingNow that summer’s here, you and your family are hopefully spending a lot more time outdoors, enjoying a variety of activities. That’s great for your health and state of mind, but you’ll want to take a few precautions to make sure you all stay safe. Continue reading

Westchester Allergist Offers Food Allergy Primer for Parents

Posted on: July 8, 2014

A FOOD ALLERGY PRIMER FOR PARENTS

Dr. Craig Osleeb

Creamy Peanut Butter with PeanutsIf it seems like more and more children are developing food allergies, it’s because they are. According to data from the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the number of children with diagnosed food allergies has jumped 18 percent in the last 20 years, and the number of kids seeking emergency treatment for allergies has tripled. Continue reading

Westchester Registered Dietitian on Helping Kids Make Healthy Food Choices

Posted on: June 25, 2014

Empower Your Child to Eat Healthy…For Life

 

By Elisa Bremner

Family All Together At Christmas DinnerYour child loves ice cream (who doesn’t?). You love your child. So how do you limit junk food or sweets to help them maintain a healthy weight? In this age of sedentary video game play and easy availability of high-calorie snacks, the challenge for busy parents is finding practical ways to help kids make good food choices. Continue reading

Adjusting to Daylight Saving Time for Children

Posted on: March 5, 2014

Sweat Dreams

By Dr. Lewis Kass, Pediatric Sleep Specialist, Northern Westchester Hospital

Kass,(Lewis J. Kass, MD)Children’s busy schedules may have more of an impact on their sleep than daylight saving time.

In today’s world the one hour time change is the smallest of the issues that affect our children’s ability to get to sleep. Most school-age children are so over scheduled that they come home exhausted. From school to swim or basketball or soccer practice to piano lessons to homework then ending the day with television or video games or tablet time, a child’s day should’ve ended long before a bedtime that is frequently later than it should be.

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