Category Archives: Pediatrics

The Clever Cook: Back to School Lunchbox Learning

Posted on: September 8, 2015

The Clever Cook: Back to School Lunchbox Learning

By Amy Rosenfeld

Getting in the back-to-school swing after a relaxing, stress-free summer might be difficult, but Banana Sunbutter Sushiit’s definitely doable. Here are some tips to get lunchbox organized:

1) Start a lunchbox meal planner and start a rotation. It may sound silly but taking the task of thinking of ideas out of your daily routine is a real time saver.
2) Get organized with great lunchbox materials. Stock up on a variety of portable containers, including many sizes for hot and cold packing.
3) Make recipes ahead and freeze. As much as you can do ahead of time, the better off you will be. One way to get started: make soups ahead and freeze in ice cube trays for easy defrosting.
4) Make time to pack lunches ahead. Pack ahead as much you can on the weekends for easy lunchbox stuffing. Get the kids to help and make an assembly line into a game! Then, take a few minutes at night to pack lunches instead of during the morning rush.

Fun and easy out-of-the-box lunchbox ideas:

1) BYO Pita Pizzas – Pack the tools they need to make their own pizza at lunch. Pack different sauces like tomato, pesto, or hummus as the base and send a variety of cheese and veggies for toppings. Here is a great example of hummus pizza:
2) Whole Grain Pasta and Noodle Salads – Cold and hot noodle or pasta salads can be an easy way to get all the food groups. Experiment with different types of pasta, everything from Asian Buckwheat Noodles to Orzo Salad:
3) Summer Soups with Grilled Cheese Dippers – Who doesn’t love soup in a thermos? Add a side of grilled cheese dipper strips and you have a balanced, delicious lunch. Plus, soup is an easy, nutrient rich make-ahead meal for a whole week of lunches or from the freezer. Try this End of Summer Soup Recipe:
4) Bento Box – Make meals out of snacks. Make sure to include proteins, including cheese, nut butters, tuna/egg/chicken salad, or sliced turkey or chicken, and a whole grain, like whole grain crackers or pretzels. Experiment with different dips like hummus, guacamole and veggie dips. Add a side of fruit and veggies.
5) Breakfast in a Box – Your little one doesn’t like lunch food? Pack a brunch style lunch with breakfast foods instead. Add yogurt parfaits, cottage cheese with fruit, whole grain pancakes or waffles, sweet and savory muffins, and hardboiled eggs.

Try NWH’s Sunbutter Sushi:

(serves 1)
1 6” tortilla wrap
1 banana, whole
1 tbsp sunflower seed butter*
1 tsp chocolate shavings

*Feel free to substitute peanut or almond butter as great alternatives!

1) Lay the tortilla on a flat surface. Spread the sunflower seed butter evenly over one side of the tortilla.
2) Place the banana on one edge of the tortilla. Roll the banana inside the tortilla until completely rolled up. Slice the tortilla into 6 even pieces (like sushi).
3) Dip each piece of sushi into the chocolate shavings. Eat immediately or wrap for an easy snack on the go!

Nutrition Facts (per serving): 370 calories, 13 g fat, 1.1 g saturated fat, 390 mg sodium, 55 g carbohydrates, 8.5 g fiber, 10 g protein
Breakfast for Lunch: Silver Dollar Oatmeal Pancakes

(serves 4, make 16 silver dollar cakes)
1 cup all-purpose flour
½ cup old fashioned oatmeal
2 tsp cinnamon
1 tsp nutmeg
1 tbsp sugar
1 tsp salt
2 ¾ tsp baking powder
1 egg, beaten
1 cup skim milk
4 tbsp unsweetened applesauce
1 cup fresh berries
1 cup low-fat Greek yogurt
1 tbsp pure maple syrup

1) Preheat the griddle on medium heat and the oven to 200 degrees.

2) While the griddle is heating up, in a large bowl mix all the dry ingredients. Make a small well in the center of the dry ingredients and add the egg, milk, applesauce to the center. Slowly mix the dry ingredients into the wet until just combined. Do not over-mix – some lumps are ok. Let the batter stand for about 5 minutes.

3) Spray the grill with cooking spray. Using a small ladle, spoon batter carefully onto the grill – 1 ladles per pancake. Do not touch until you start to see some bubbles start to form on the surface.  Add a few berries to each cake. Cook for about another 1-2 minutes.

4) As each pancake is done, place in the oven to stay warm. Mix the Greek yogurt with pure maple syrup and top with a dollop of Greek yogurt on each pancake.

Nutrition Facts (per serving): 320 calories, 4 g total fat, 1.5 g saturated fat, 600 mg sodium, 60 g carbohydrates, 4.5 g fiber, 9.5 g protein

Editor’s Note: Amy Rosenfeld, M,S RD, CDN is a Registered Dietitian at Northern Westchester Hospital

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Summer Safety Tips

Posted on: August 5, 2015

Summer Safety Tips

By Dr. Peter Richel

Keeping children healthy and safe through the summer months takes preventive measures. ChildreYoung Family Parents and Boy Son Cyclingn should wear protective gear for whatever activity they may be engaged in—helmets for biking and skateboarding, life jackets for swimming, and so on.

However, there is safety gear for activities you may not consider dangerous. Because ticks are such a concern, I recommend children wear shoes, socks, light pants tucked into the socks, and long sleeves when hiking in the woods. Clothing can be sprayed lightly with Deep Woods Off—but it’s too strong to use directly on children’s skin. For the skin, parents can apply Skintastic or Avon Skin-So-Soft with good repellent quality and demonstrated safety. (However, don’t use these on infants less than 6 months of age.) The best prevention is in daily tick and rash checks—just line up the kids at bath time!

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Surprising Findings for Infants at Risk for Peanut Allergies

Posted on: July 29, 2015

Does early introduction of peanut products reduce the incidence of peanut allergy?

By Dr. Craig Osleeb

Creamy Peanut Butter with PeanutsPeanut allergy is a major problem. It is currently one of the 6 most common causes of food allergy in childhood. The prevalence of peanut allergy has risen over the past decade and currently affects approximately 1.4% of the USA population. While many children will outgrow their food allergy to milk, egg, wheat and soy, 82% of those allergic to peanut will remain so for life. This is a great concern to parents, patient’s and the healthcare community at large. In February of this year the New England Journal of Medicine published a prospective placebo blinded study (Learning Early about Peanut Allergy, LEAP, study) that has far reaching implications for the prevention of peanut allergy.

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Kids and the Flu: Symptoms, When to Seek Care

Posted on: January 29, 2015

Flu Season’s in High Gear: How to Protect and Care for Your Kids

By Dr. Pete Richel

We are now in the middle of Influenza season (“the Flu”), which is typically October ID-100228285_Boy And Vaccine Syringe by Sura Nualpradidthrough March. Locally we did not see much of this in October and November, but it commenced last month and is going strong.

Most of the positive cultures are revealing Influenza type A, and even though the Influenza vaccine was not a great match this year, we still encourage all to receive it, since it may be protective against some strains, and we find no significant down side.

All children 6 months and older should be vaccinated against the flu.
-Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

It’s not too late to receive this at your doctor’s office. The vaccine is approved for those 6 months of age and older. When someone gets “the Flu” at any age, the classic symptoms are:

  • temperature instability (fever) as the body’s immune system fights for us,
  • generalized achiness,
  • and a rather hacking cough.

“…frequent hand washing for patients and their caretakers
will help to prevent contagion.”

When any of these symptoms occur, bring your child to see your pediatrician. We can evaluate them with a physical exam, of course, and we can do a rapid Flu test and make the diagnosis in minutes. If the test is positive, then we can prescribe Tamiflu, a medication which may lessen the severity of symptoms, and may shorten the usual week long course of the illness.

In addition, it is always prudent to keep up with plenty of fluids to prevent dehydration and the need for hospitalization. And we all know that good frequent hand washing for patients and their caretakers will help to prevent contagion. This is something that you don’t want to share!

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, “some children are at especially high risk.” Children at greatest risk of serious flu-related complications include the following:
1. Children younger than 6 months old -These children are too young to be vaccinated. The best way to protect them is to make sure people around them are vaccinated
2. Children aged 6 months up to their 5th birthday.
3. American Indian and Alaskan Native children.
4. Children with chronic health problems, such as: Asthma, neurological and neurodevelopmental conditions, Chronic lung disease, Heart disease, Diabetes or a weakended immune system.

Editor’s Note:
Peter Richel, MD, FAAP is Chief of Pediatrics at Northern Westchester Hospital. He is a member of Westchester Health Associates and has practiced on Smith Avenue in Mt. Kisco since 1990. Dr. Pete has authored “Happy and Healthy,” a book on wellness in the first year of life, and produced a CD of children’s songs called “Welcome to Dr. Pete’s Office.” Both of these are intended to educate and entertain children and their families.

Dr. Pete, as he’s fondly known, has received numerous recognitions including: Castle Connolly Top Doctor, Top Pediatrician by the Consumer’s Research Council of America and honored with Patients’ Choice Awards and Compassionate Doctor Awards.

Photo Credit: Sura Nualpradid /


Plant-based Diet Considered Healthiest by Dietitian

Posted on: January 28, 2015

Healthful Eating: The Plant-based Diet

By Jill Ashbey-Pejoves

As a dietitian I am often asked what I consider to be the healthiest diet. This is an easy question to answer because the research is fairly clear that a plant-based diet is best for farmers market 2overall health. You may be wondering exactly what a plant-based diet is. Well the definition ranges from one in which no animal products are consumed, a vegan diet, to one in which some animal products are consumed and not others, a vegetarian diet, to one in which all foods are consumed, but plant foods comprise the majority, a flexitarian or Mediterranean diet. A well balanced plant-based diet provides all the essential amino acids necessary for adequate protein and is high in fiber.

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