Category Archives: Pediatrics

A Frightful Evening for Health-Conscious Parents

Posted on: October 31, 2016

It’s the morning of October 31st and our tiny ghouls, goblins and ghosts are waiting in anticipation for the school day to be over so they can go door-to-door, collecting candy and sweets from countless neighboring homes. While many health-conscious parents dread the arrival of All Hallows Eve, there are ways to give children a healthy balance. Here, I will give you tips for a health conscious fright night – without resorting to the dreaded toothbrush giveaway. By Jackie Farrall, RD, CDN, Northern Westchester Hospital

Have your Mini-Frankenstein’s Eat before they Trick-or-Treat.
What child doesn’t want to quickly devour the bounty of sweet treats they worked so hard to gather? Studies show that eating a healthy meal, packed with fiber and protein, before trick-or-treating reduces a child’s temptation to overindulge in sweets as their tummies will already be full. This is a great way of controlling the amount of sugar your children are consuming throughout the evening.

Best Costume Award Goes to: Non-Sugary Treats
Animal crackers, granola bars, popcorn, or even mini pretzel bags are fun and healthy options for children this Halloween. While kids may find these healthy treats a bit boring on such a festive night, you can look for fun packaging that may dress up these options and make them more eye-catching and appealing! You can also try making homemade popcorn or nutritious muffins and letting your little one help package, or costume it, in a spookily-clad bag– instantly making homemade wholesome treats more fun and engaging!

Like Children, Monsters Need Moderation, too!
Limiting the size of trick-or-treat bags for children is a great tip to keep things moderately healthy on Halloween. Instead of giving your child a pillowcase – which can hold nearly 48 pounds of candy — choose a small gift bag, instead. Once the night is over and costumes are hung up, limit candy to 1-3 small pieces per day. The rest of the candy should remain out of sight out and out of mind. This will show kids that they can still enjoy a special treat without going overboard.

MUAH-HA-HA You’d Never Think These Halloween Treats Have Half the Sugar

Pumpkin Spice Kettle Corn Popcorn

pumpkin-spice-kettle-cornIngredients
1 Tsp ground cinnamon
1/4 Tsp of nutmeg
1/4 Tsp ground ginger
1/2 Tsp of coconut oil
1/2 cup of popcorn kernels
5 Tbsp of sugar
1/2 Tsp salt

Directions
In a small bowl, combine cinnamon, nutmeg and ginger, set aside. Melt the coconut oil in a medium pot over medium-low heat. Once melted, add popcorn kernels, sugar and salt, cover with a lid. Shake the pot every 3 seconds until a full 3 seconds elapse in between kernel pops. Pour the popcorn into a bowl. Sprinkle with spice mix, and toss. Let popcorn sit for 5 minutes, until the sugar coating turns from sticky to crunchy.

Recipe Courtesy of: Amy’s Healthy Baking 

Chocolate Chip Pumpkin Mini Muffins

chocolate-chip-pumpkin-mini-muffinsIngredients
2 cups of whole wheat flour
4 Tsp of ground cinnamon
1 ½ Tsp baking powder
1/2 Tsp baking soda
1/2 Tsp salt
1 Tbsp coconut oil (can use unsalted butter instead)
1 ½ Tsp of vanilla extract
4 Tsp of sugar
3/4 cup of pumpkin puree
1/2 cup Greek yogurt
1/2 cup nonfat milk
1/4 cup miniature chocolate chips

Directions
Preheat oven to 350 degrees and lightly coat 32 mini muffin cups with nonstick cooking spray. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cinnamon, baking powder and salt. In a separate bowl, whisk together coconut oil and sugar. Stir in pumpkin puree and Greek yogurt – mixing until smooth. Stir in flour and milk. Fold in 3 Tbsp of mini chocolate chips. Next, divide the batter between the prepared muffin cups and gently press the remaining chocolate chips into the tops. Bake for 12-15 minutes.

Recipe Courtesy of: Amy’s Healthy Baking

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New Solutions for Inflammatory Bowel Disease (IBD)

Posted on: January 12, 2016

Something to Cheer About

By Dr. Elie Abemayor

I remember the day when an 18-year-old cheerleader came to see me, she knew something was dramatically wrong—but she didn’t want to talk about it. The normally bouncy high school student was becoming less social, and she was losing weight. She was having bowel issues, and she really didn’t want to talk about it.

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Care and Comfort for the Common Cold

Posted on: December 15, 2015

Sneezing and coughing, symptoms of the common cold, are prevalent throughout the winter, and not surprisingly. According to the Centers for Disease Control and prevention, children average about six to eight colds each year. Understanding the symptoms, listening to your child and knowing when to see your doctor will help you provide the care and comfort your child needs.

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The Clever Cook: Back to School Lunchbox Learning

Posted on: September 8, 2015

The Clever Cook: Back to School Lunchbox Learning

By Amy Rosenfeld

Getting in the back-to-school swing after a relaxing, stress-free summer might be difficult, but Banana Sunbutter Sushiit’s definitely doable. Here are some tips to get lunchbox organized:

1) Start a lunchbox meal planner and start a rotation. It may sound silly but taking the task of thinking of ideas out of your daily routine is a real time saver.
2) Get organized with great lunchbox materials. Stock up on a variety of portable containers, including many sizes for hot and cold packing.
3) Make recipes ahead and freeze. As much as you can do ahead of time, the better off you will be. One way to get started: make soups ahead and freeze in ice cube trays for easy defrosting.

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Summer Safety Tips

Posted on: August 5, 2015

Summer Safety Tips

By Dr. Peter Richel

Keeping children healthy and safe through the summer months takes preventive measures. ChildreYoung Family Parents and Boy Son Cyclingn should wear protective gear for whatever activity they may be engaged in—helmets for biking and skateboarding, life jackets for swimming, and so on.

However, there is safety gear for activities you may not consider dangerous. Because ticks are such a concern, I recommend children wear shoes, socks, light pants tucked into the socks, and long sleeves when hiking in the woods. Clothing can be sprayed lightly with Deep Woods Off—but it’s too strong to use directly on children’s skin. For the skin, parents can apply Skintastic or Avon Skin-So-Soft with good repellent quality and demonstrated safety. (However, don’t use these on infants less than 6 months of age.) The best prevention is in daily tick and rash checks—just line up the kids at bath time!

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