Category Archives: Hospital Services

Northern Westchester Hospital provides services for everybody’s health need.

Healthy Snacks On-The-Go

Posted on: April 6, 2015

Nutritionist Approved:
Healthy snack products to look for on your next grocery trip

By Elisa Bremner, RD
This is the first edition of a series of nutritionist-approved food products on the market.

Snacks are an important and useful way to stave off hunger, bolster nutrient intake, keep energy up and satisfy the occasional craving (for emotional health!). But the best food is always the whole food. For snacks, I recommend fruit, vegetables and “mini meals” like a bowl of soup or ½ sandwich.

Processed, packaged food can fit into your balanced diet, but should never become the basis of your diet. Unfortunately, it’s just not possible for most of us to prepare fresh, whole-food snacks every time we get hungry. Practically speaking, when we’re running around all day, a packaged snack food may be the only option. We have choices. Here are five of my faves:

Continue reading

TwitterFacebookShare |

Pulmonary Rehab and Quality of Life

Posted on: April 1, 2015

Pulmonary Rehab Can Improve Quality of Life

By Harlan R. Weinberg

Pulmonary rehabilitation (PR) is increasingly recognized as a significant part of treatment for Human respiratory system, artworkpeople with chronic respiratory illnesses and other lung conditions. Even for those with very impaired lung function, this specialized rehab can improve quality of life and the ability to live independently. Here, I explain how PR offers new hope to people with breathing difficulties.

Continue reading

Dealing with Caregiver Stress

Posted on: March 20, 2015

“Caregiving can be very isolating, is a job most people didn’t apply for and never received proper training in, and does not pay very well,” says Jerri Rosenfeld, a social worker at Northern Westchester Hospital’s Ken Hamilton Caregivers Center in Mount Kisco, NY. Jerri spoke with Health.com; read complete article here to see tips on dealing with the stress of being a family caregiver.

Ken Hamilton Caregivers Center Northern Westchester HospitalAccording to the National Alliance for Caregiving, roughly one third of adults in this country are the caregiver for an elderly, ill or disabled family member. Two thirds of those caregivers are women.  And many of those women are also caring for children at home.

There are a number of resources available to you. How to find those resources is where the Ken Hamilton Caregivers Center comes in. Visit the Caregivers Center here.  Family caregivers find a wealth of practical resources and supportive staff.  You don’t have to go it alone.

Hip Replacement Surgery on the Rise

Posted on: March 19, 2015

Hip Replacement Surgery on the Rise

By Dr. Eric Grossman

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released findings iStock_3875724_LoRezthat from 2000 to 2010, the number of hip replacements for those older than 45 more than doubled.

The CDC said: “The number and rate of total hip replacements among inpatients aged 45 and over increased significantly from 2000 through 2010. The greatest increase in absolute numbers was in the 55–64 age group, where the number of total hip replacements almost tripled, whereas the greatest percentage change was in the 45–54 age group, which experienced a 205% increase. The 45–54 age group also had the greatest increase in rate, which more than doubled from 45 to 117 total hip replacements per 100,000 population.” (February 12, 2015).

I am not surprised by these trends based on improvements in surgical technique, durability of the procedure, durability of the implants, and patients’ desired active lifestyles. In my practice, I use what is called the “anterior approach” which can result in a faster recovery time, without postoperative restrictions, less muscle damage and a more natural feel to the artificial hip.

Previous generations of general practitioners were reticent to suggest hip replacement to their patients because of longer hospital stays, unproven effectiveness and longer recovery times. There was a time when doctors did not suggest hip replacement due to arthritis pain until their patients could not bear to suffer any longer.

Now, with advances in the surgical procedure, primary care physicians are more inclined to suggest the surgery. This is in part driven by their patients’ expectations. Individuals with painful arthritis are taking a proactive approach – they do not want to suffer in pain any longer than necessary. Additionally, they want to engage in an active lifestyle, and many advances in the surgery since it began to be performed approximately 50 years ago have made the new hips more durable.

The CDC also found that “In 2010, the average length of stay was shortest for the youngest age group and longest for the oldest group. Among those aged 45–54, the average stay was 3 days, lower than for each of the other age groups, while the average among those aged 75 and over was 4 days, higher than for each of the other age groups. From 2000 through 2010, the average length of stay decreased for each age group.”

These findings studied patients until 2010. Now, in 2015, I am seeing much shorter hospital stays after hip replacement surgery. Approximately 80 percent of my patients go straight home from the hospital – not to an inpatient rehabilitation facility as had been routine in the past – within 24-48 hours after surgery. Some select patients are even able to go home the same day of surgery. Our rehab protocols include rapid mobilization where the patients are expected to walk the same day as their surgery.

Watch Dr. Grossman’s patients tell their stories of
living life without pain after hip replacement.
View patient testimonials.

Hip replacement surgery has become more routine and is now being offered to a much wider demographic of patient, particularly patients ages 45-64 and it is not only helpful for senior citizens. There is no need to suffer with painful and activity-limiting hip arthritis. Talk to your doctor to see if hip replacement surgery is an option to explore.

Editor’s Note:
Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS is Co-Director of Joint Replacement Surgery at the Orthopedic and Spine Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital and a member of Mount Kisco Medical Group.

Dr. Grossman is a fellowship trained, board certified orthopedic surgeon who specializes in all facets of hip and knee joint replacement surgery including primary and revision total joint replacement, with a focus on the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacement.

 

 

 

 

Sleep Your Way to Better Health

Posted on: March 4, 2015

Sleep Your Way to Better Health

By Dr. Praveen Rudraraju

If you’re struggling to get enough sleep, don’t take your tossing and turning lightly. Good sleep is a necessity, not an option. We know that most people require around seven to eight hours a night, and it’s vital that you get it.

iStock_41874820_HiRezSleep supports the body and brain in so many ways that science is only beginning to fully understand. We form memories during sleep, and there’s evidence that regular sleep improves memory. Likewise, sleep seems to facilitate learning, whether it’s acquiring a new skill like playing the piano, learning how to tackle new responsibilities at work, or school kids putting to use the rules of geometry or grammar.

Sound sleep also keeps you healthy. Research from the Sleep Heart Health Study indicates that people who get less than five hours of sleep nightly are 2.5 times more likely to have diabetes. That study and several other similar ones have found that averaging less than five hours of shuteye a night raises the risk of heart disease by 45 percent. What’s more, poor sleep increases the likelihood of suffering mood disorders like anxiety, depression, and alcohol abuse. High school students in particular seem to be susceptible to behavior problems and mood disturbance when they don’t get enough sleep.

Sound sleep keeps you healthy.

So how do you insure you get enough? There are plenty of ways to improve sleep without resorting to prescription drugs. However, if you routinely battle insomnia, see a doctor about possible solutions. A sleep lab, such as the one at NWH, can be helpful in diagnosing serious sleep conditions such as sleep apnea, which prevents deep sleep and is characterized by heavy snoring. The treatments for sleep disorders have come a long way and are very effective. Most people find that they can begin sleeping much more soundly and suddenly have a lot more energy and concentration during the day once they’ve been diagnosed and get treatment. Plus, they gain all the health benefits a good night’s sleep can bestow.

Tips for Good Sleep Hygiene
Set a regular bedtime. By hitting the sack the same time every evening, you’ll train your body to slow down and have an easier time falling asleep. Even better, establish a small ritual before climbing into the covers, whether it’s a glass of milk (which has tryptophan, an amino acid that encourages sleep), a warm bath, or some gentle relaxation exercises like deep breathing or leisurely yoga stretches.

Try not to nap within eight hours of bedtime—especially if you typically have a hard time drifting off. And limit naps to 25 minutes. Naps can throw off your internal rhythms, making it tougher for your body to slow down at night.

Don’t have alcohol or caffeine within two hours of bedtime. Coffee can keep you up, of course; a drink may help you fall asleep, but when your body starts digesting the alcohol sugars later in the middle of the night, you may find yourself heating up or dreaming intensely, and both can disrupt sleep.

No heavy meals or sugary food right before bed. An active, full belly will have you tossing and turning.

Exercise regularly, but not within two hours of bedtime. Your body takes awhile to slow down and relax into a ready-for-sleep state. However, several studies have linked regular exercise earlier in the day to sounder sleep.

Keep your bedroom dark. Any light can disrupt slumber, so invest in heavy curtains or good blinds.

Shut out noise. If you live in a noisy neighborhood, try wearing ear plugs at night.

Keep it cool. Be sure to turn down the heater at night. The best sleeping temperature is cool—58 to 62 degrees—but not cold.

Check your mattress. About every five to seven years, you’ll need a new one. Not sure how long you’ve had yours? Ask yourself whether you sleep better when you’re away from home. If the answer is yes, it could be your mattress. Pillows don’t last forever, either.

Reserve your bed for sleeping. If you look forward to reading or watching television in bed, you’ll train yourself to be awake when you should be sleeping instead.

Editor’s Note: Dr. Praveen Rudraraju is the Director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital. The Center for Sleep Medicine at NWH has achieved The American Academy of Sleep Medicine 5-year Accreditation.

Learn more about how you can feel better and start improving your sleep today, visit the National Sleep Foundation www.sleep.org.