Category Archives: Orthopedics & Spine

Manny Pacquiao, Punching Power and the Rotator Cuff

Posted on: May 8, 2015

Manny Pacquiao, Punching Power and the Role of the Rotator Cuff

Dr. Victor Khabie, Chief of the Department of Surgery and Chief of Sports Medicine at
Northern Westchester Hospital in Mount Kisco, NY dispenses advice on rotator cuff surgery in light of professional boxer Manny Pacquiao’s shoulder injury.

When Dr. Khabie is not performing orthopedic surgery, he is a Ring Side Physician for the New York State Athletic Commission where he cares for professional boxers and has been present at ringside for numerous world championship bouts.

Dr. Khabie says, “I will be very difficult to box at a high level with a rotator cuff tear. The rotator cuff is critical in generating the punching power that boxers require to fight effectively. I believe that his injury significantly influenced the outcome of the recent high-profile fight against Floyd Mayweather.”

He adds, “The good news is that rotator cuff surgery is generally a very successful operation but can take one year to fully heal. A rematch in one year may be of interest to fight fans as Pacquiao would be at full force and would probably make a more competitive opponent. Mayweather will want to prove that he can beat Pacquiao when Pacquiao is back at full force and injury free.”

A lot of people, not just professional athletes, tear the rotator cuff in their shoulders. Dr. Khabie shares his thoughts on the signs of an injury, and what to expect when having rotator cuff surgery.

Signs of a rotator cuff injury

“If an individual has pain in their shoulder for more than seven days, experiences pain in their shoulder while he or she is trying to sleep at night, or has trouble lifting their arm above their head, it is time to see an orthopedic surgeon to see what is going on.”

Dr. Khabie adds that, “If someone sustains an injury while engaging physical activity, or a heavy object falls on the shoulder, he or she should have it looked at by an orthopedic surgeon to get to the bottom of the injury sustained.”

Can this surgery be avoided?

“Sometimes,” says Dr. Khabie. “If there isn’t in fact  a tear, physical therapy can often help along with exercises at home using an exercise band.”

Why would someone have the surgery?

“When a rotator cuff tears, it is no longer connected to the bone in the shoulder, called the humerus. It can only be reattached with surgery,” says Dr. Khabie.

How long is the hospital stay?

“Rotator cuff surgery patients go home the same day as the procedure. We operate on our patients arthroscopically, meaning we use only tiny incisions, which is much less invasive and speeds up the recovery time,” says Dr. Khabie.

What is the recovery like?

“Patients spend about four to six weeks with their arm in a sling. It takes several months to recover. After six months, most people are cleared to begin normal physical activity and exercise, or in the case of a professional athlete, they can begin training,” says Dr. Khabie. “After nine months, most patients feel back to normal.”

Editor’s Note:
Dr. Victor Khabie, MD, FAAOS, FACS is a member of the Somers Orthopedic Surgery and Sports Medicine Group. Dr. Khabie received his medical degree from Harvard Medical School and completed his fellowship in sports medicine at the world-renowned Kerlan-Jobe Orthopaedic Clinic in Los Angeles, California, where he served as assistant team physician to professional sports teams including the LA Lakers, Dodgers, Kings, Mighty Ducks, LA Sparks, and the USC Trojan football team.

Watch Dr. Khabie discuss the role of sports medicine in keeping athletes in competitive condition.

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Hip Replacement Surgery on the Rise

Posted on: March 19, 2015

Hip Replacement Surgery on the Rise

By Dr. Eric Grossman

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released findings iStock_3875724_LoRezthat from 2000 to 2010, the number of hip replacements for those older than 45 more than doubled.

The CDC said: “The number and rate of total hip replacements among inpatients aged 45 and over increased significantly from 2000 through 2010. The greatest increase in absolute numbers was in the 55–64 age group, where the number of total hip replacements almost tripled, whereas the greatest percentage change was in the 45–54 age group, which experienced a 205% increase. The 45–54 age group also had the greatest increase in rate, which more than doubled from 45 to 117 total hip replacements per 100,000 population.” (February 12, 2015).

I am not surprised by these trends based on improvements in surgical technique, durability of the procedure, durability of the implants, and patients’ desired active lifestyles. In my practice, I use what is called the “anterior approach” which can result in a faster recovery time, without postoperative restrictions, less muscle damage and a more natural feel to the artificial hip.

Previous generations of general practitioners were reticent to suggest hip replacement to their patients because of longer hospital stays, unproven effectiveness and longer recovery times. There was a time when doctors did not suggest hip replacement due to arthritis pain until their patients could not bear to suffer any longer.

Now, with advances in the surgical procedure, primary care physicians are more inclined to suggest the surgery. This is in part driven by their patients’ expectations. Individuals with painful arthritis are taking a proactive approach – they do not want to suffer in pain any longer than necessary. Additionally, they want to engage in an active lifestyle, and many advances in the surgery since it began to be performed approximately 50 years ago have made the new hips more durable.

The CDC also found that “In 2010, the average length of stay was shortest for the youngest age group and longest for the oldest group. Among those aged 45–54, the average stay was 3 days, lower than for each of the other age groups, while the average among those aged 75 and over was 4 days, higher than for each of the other age groups. From 2000 through 2010, the average length of stay decreased for each age group.”

These findings studied patients until 2010. Now, in 2015, I am seeing much shorter hospital stays after hip replacement surgery. Approximately 80 percent of my patients go straight home from the hospital – not to an inpatient rehabilitation facility as had been routine in the past – within 24-48 hours after surgery. Some select patients are even able to go home the same day of surgery. Our rehab protocols include rapid mobilization where the patients are expected to walk the same day as their surgery.

Watch Dr. Grossman’s patients tell their stories of
living life without pain after hip replacement.
View patient testimonials.

Hip replacement surgery has become more routine and is now being offered to a much wider demographic of patient, particularly patients ages 45-64 and it is not only helpful for senior citizens. There is no need to suffer with painful and activity-limiting hip arthritis. Talk to your doctor to see if hip replacement surgery is an option to explore.

Editor’s Note:
Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS is Co-Director of Joint Replacement Surgery at the Orthopedic and Spine Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital and a member of Mount Kisco Medical Group.

Dr. Grossman is a fellowship trained, board certified orthopedic surgeon who specializes in all facets of hip and knee joint replacement surgery including primary and revision total joint replacement, with a focus on the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacement.

 

 

 

 

Detroit Tiger Victor Martinez’ Torn Meniscus

Posted on: February 6, 2015

By Dr. Victor Khabie

I recently spoke with Jason Beck, a writer for MLB.com about Detroit Tiger Victor Martinez’ torn meniscus.

new york orthopedist, orthopedic surgeon westchester

Dr. Victor Khabie, Co-Chief of Orthopedic Surgery, Director of Sports Medicine, Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospitl

A torn meniscus is one of the three most common sports-related knee injuries. Made of cartilage, the meniscus is the knee’s “shock absorber,” and a tear causes pain and dysfunction. Another common knee injury is to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a key ligament stabilizing the knee. And lastly, a torn medial collateral ligament (MCL), which keeps the tibia (shinbone) in place, usually consists of a partial tear.

There are two types of surgeries that can be done to repair a torn meniscus: The first, a partial meniscectomy which is a minor surgery where a small piece of the meniscus is clipped. The average recovery time for this procedure is four to six weeks. The other option would be reattachment surgery, which is more complex and recovery could take months.

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Sports Medicine Expert on Concussion Symptoms and Dangers

Posted on: October 14, 2014

Concussion Management. Assessing the Symptoms.

By Dr. Eric Small

While a headache is among the best-known and first symptoms of a concussion, there are often delayed symptoms that indicate ongoing mild brain damage and require treatment. Ten percent of symptoms don’t present for a week or more.

For this reason, it is essential that parents and teachers as well as emergency room physicians and pediatricians recognize the need to monitor a young injured athlete for the full spectrum of possible symptoms. In my experience, when the athlete gets over the initial headache, or perhaps never experiences this symptom, parents and youngster often push for a quick return to all activities. But that can put a young person at serious risk.

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Foot and Ankle Surgeon Discusses Flat Feet

Posted on: May 28, 2014

Feet That Go Flat

By Dr. Kurt Voellmicke,

A00173F02_foot_MedRezThere are aspects of getting older that are simply no fun. For example: In some people — mainly women over 40 — the feet will just give out. More specifically, they get adult-acquired flat foot, says. (Men get it too, by the way.)

People usually recognize something’s wrong when they start to experience pain on the inner side of the ankle.

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