Category Archives: Orthopedics & Spine

Hip Replacement Surgery on the Rise

Posted on: March 19, 2015

Hip Replacement Surgery on the Rise

By Dr. Eric Grossman

Researchers at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) recently released findings iStock_3875724_LoRezthat from 2000 to 2010, the number of hip replacements for those older than 45 more than doubled.

The CDC said: “The number and rate of total hip replacements among inpatients aged 45 and over increased significantly from 2000 through 2010. The greatest increase in absolute numbers was in the 55–64 age group, where the number of total hip replacements almost tripled, whereas the greatest percentage change was in the 45–54 age group, which experienced a 205% increase. The 45–54 age group also had the greatest increase in rate, which more than doubled from 45 to 117 total hip replacements per 100,000 population.” (February 12, 2015).

I am not surprised by these trends based on improvements in surgical technique, durability of the procedure, durability of the implants, and patients’ desired active lifestyles. In my practice, I use what is called the “anterior approach” which can result in a faster recovery time, without postoperative restrictions, less muscle damage and a more natural feel to the artificial hip.

Previous generations of general practitioners were reticent to suggest hip replacement to their patients because of longer hospital stays, unproven effectiveness and longer recovery times. There was a time when doctors did not suggest hip replacement due to arthritis pain until their patients could not bear to suffer any longer.

Now, with advances in the surgical procedure, primary care physicians are more inclined to suggest the surgery. This is in part driven by their patients’ expectations. Individuals with painful arthritis are taking a proactive approach – they do not want to suffer in pain any longer than necessary. Additionally, they want to engage in an active lifestyle, and many advances in the surgery since it began to be performed approximately 50 years ago have made the new hips more durable.

The CDC also found that “In 2010, the average length of stay was shortest for the youngest age group and longest for the oldest group. Among those aged 45–54, the average stay was 3 days, lower than for each of the other age groups, while the average among those aged 75 and over was 4 days, higher than for each of the other age groups. From 2000 through 2010, the average length of stay decreased for each age group.”

These findings studied patients until 2010. Now, in 2015, I am seeing much shorter hospital stays after hip replacement surgery. Approximately 80 percent of my patients go straight home from the hospital – not to an inpatient rehabilitation facility as had been routine in the past – within 24-48 hours after surgery. Some select patients are even able to go home the same day of surgery. Our rehab protocols include rapid mobilization where the patients are expected to walk the same day as their surgery.

Watch Dr. Grossman’s patients tell their stories of
living life without pain after hip replacement.
View patient testimonials.

Hip replacement surgery has become more routine and is now being offered to a much wider demographic of patient, particularly patients ages 45-64 and it is not only helpful for senior citizens. There is no need to suffer with painful and activity-limiting hip arthritis. Talk to your doctor to see if hip replacement surgery is an option to explore.

Editor’s Note:
Eric L. Grossman, MD, FAAOS is Co-Director of Joint Replacement Surgery at the Orthopedic and Spine Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital and a member of Mount Kisco Medical Group.

Dr. Grossman is a fellowship trained, board certified orthopedic surgeon who specializes in all facets of hip and knee joint replacement surgery including primary and revision total joint replacement, with a focus on the Anterior Approach to Total Hip Replacement.

 

 

 

 

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Detroit Tiger Victor Martinez’ Torn Meniscus

Posted on: February 6, 2015

By Dr. Victor Khabie

I recently spoke with Jason Beck, a writer for MLB.com about Detroit Tiger Victor Martinez’ torn meniscus.

new york orthopedist, orthopedic surgeon westchester

Dr. Victor Khabie, Co-Chief of Orthopedic Surgery, Director of Sports Medicine, Orthopedic and Spine Institute, Northern Westchester Hospitl

A torn meniscus is one of the three most common sports-related knee injuries. Made of cartilage, the meniscus is the knee’s “shock absorber,” and a tear causes pain and dysfunction. Another common knee injury is to the anterior cruciate ligament (ACL), a key ligament stabilizing the knee. And lastly, a torn medial collateral ligament (MCL), which keeps the tibia (shinbone) in place, usually consists of a partial tear.

There are two types of surgeries that can be done to repair a torn meniscus: The first, a partial meniscectomy which is a minor surgery where a small piece of the meniscus is clipped. The average recovery time for this procedure is four to six weeks. The other option would be reattachment surgery, which is more complex and recovery could take months.

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Sports Medicine Expert on Concussion Symptoms and Dangers

Posted on: October 14, 2014

Concussion Management. Assessing the Symptoms.

By Dr. Eric Small

While a headache is among the best-known and first symptoms of a concussion, there are often delayed symptoms that indicate ongoing mild brain damage and require treatment. Ten percent of symptoms don’t present for a week or more.

For this reason, it is essential that parents and teachers as well as emergency room physicians and pediatricians recognize the need to monitor a young injured athlete for the full spectrum of possible symptoms. In my experience, when the athlete gets over the initial headache, or perhaps never experiences this symptom, parents and youngster often push for a quick return to all activities. But that can put a young person at serious risk.

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Foot and Ankle Surgeon Discusses Flat Feet

Posted on: May 28, 2014

Feet That Go Flat

By Dr. Kurt Voellmicke,

A00173F02_foot_MedRezThere are aspects of getting older that are simply no fun. For example: In some people — mainly women over 40 — the feet will just give out. More specifically, they get adult-acquired flat foot, says. (Men get it too, by the way.)

People usually recognize something’s wrong when they start to experience pain on the inner side of the ankle.

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New York Spine Surgeon describes the O-Arm CAT Scanner

Posted on: December 19, 2013

Meet the O-Arm:  New technology in the OR

By John Abrahams, MD, FAANS, Chief of Neurosurgery, Co-Director of Spine Surgery, Orthopedic and Spine Institute

Dr. John Abrahams Northern Westchester HospitalThe Orthopedic & Spine Institute of Northern Westchester Hospital recently brought new technology into the operating room – the O-Arm from Medtronic.

The O-Arm is an intra-operative CAT Scanner with Image Guidance used to make placement of spinal instrumentation more accurate and safer. 

Typically, the O-Arm would be mainly used for patients undergoing spine surgery that need instrumentation placed such as rods and screws.  During these procedures, patients are put to sleep with general anesthesia and prepped for surgery.  An incision is made over the surgical site and then the O-Arm is brought in to obtain a CAT Scan with three-dimensional imaging.

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