Category Archives: Cancer Treatment & Wellness Center

The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Posted on: June 22, 2015

The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Amy Rosenfeld, MS RD CDN

This 4th of July, celebrate our country’s independence with good health and a patriotic plate. American flagRed, white, and blue foods are superfoods: nutrition powerhouses packed full of rich antioxidants and phytonutrients.

Red fruits and vegetables like strawberries, tomatoes, and pomegranate, are full of phytonutrients, anthocyanins, flavonoid compounds; nutrients that reduce cancer by fighting free radicals and preventing oxidative damage to cells. Red fruits and veggies are particularly high in the phytochemical lycopene, shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

White foods often get a bad reputation but fresh white foods, such as daikon radish, turnips, jicama or pears, are packed with nutrients. The anthoxanthins in white foods can reduce inflammation of all kinds.  One of the most common anthoxanthins, quercetin, is linked with lowering the risk of heart disease and cancer, easing the symptoms of allergies, and helping with pain from arthritis.

Blue and purple fruits and vegetables like blueberries, beets, and eggplant, have rich doses of phytonutrients and flavonoids that lower your risk of heart disease. Flavonoids may also help improve memory with aging and prevent many cancers.

Try out these easy recipes for your 4th of July this year. These recipes are perfect for a party, cookout or relaxing picnic.
Grilled Chicken with Red & Blueberry Salsa 

(Adapted from All Through The Year Cheer)
(Yield:  4 servings)

Ingredients:
4 (6 oz) chicken breasts, pounded to even thickness
1 tbsp olive oil (for grilling the chicken)
½ tsp pepper
½ tsp salt
1 c fresh blueberries, chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, seed and diced
1/4 red onion, diced
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (optional)
3 TB fresh minced parsley
2 TB fresh minced mint
1 TB lemon juice

Directions:
1) In a bowl, stir together all ingredients for the salsa and refrigerate until ready to use (you can make this up to 1 day in advance but if you do so, I recommend waiting until right before you serve it to add the fresh minced herbs).
2) Lightly brush olive oil on both sides of the chicken breast, then season both sides with salt and pepper.  Grill the chicken until fully cooked (there should not be any pink).
3) Serve the grilled chicken topped with salsa.

https://allthroughtheyearcheer.wordpress.com/2010/06/25/grilled-chicken-with-red-blueberry-salsa/

Nutrition Facts: 278 calories, 12.2 g fat, 2.8 g saturated fat, 393 mg sodium, 7.7 g carbohydrates, 1.8 g fiber, 33.6 g protein
Cous-Cous & Fruit Salad

(Courtesy of Eatingwell.com)
(serves 4)

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
2 teaspoons finely chopped shallots
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 cups cooked whole-wheat couscous
1 cup chopped nectarine
1 cup mixed fresh berries, such as blueberries and raspberries
2 tablespoons toasted sliced almonds

Directions:
1. Whisk oil, orange juice, vinegar, shallots, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add cooked couscous, nectarines, berries and almonds; gently toss to combine.

Nutrition Facts: 259 calories; 9 g fat; 1 g sat; 40 g carbohydrates; 7 g protein; 7 g fiber; 146 mg sodium

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_red_white_and_blue_recipes?slide=15

 

Red, White and Blue Yogurt Popsicles

(Adapted from The View from Great Island)
Yield: 10 popsicles

Ingredients:
1 cup raspberries
1 cup blueberries
1 cup vanilla flavored Greek yogurt

Directions:
1. Using a small food processor, or blender, puree the raspberries until smooth. Set aside. Repeat for the blueberries.
2. Put your popsicle mold in the freezer and freeze till firm, at least an hour, or more.
3. Layer a little bit of the blueberry puree into the mold. Put in the freezer for 10-20 minutes until solid. Alternate with layers, putting in the freezer for 10 minutes in between each layer.
4. When done layering, insert the popsicle sticks. Make sure to get the stick a little bit into the frozen layer so they will stand straight. Put back into the freezer until solid.
5. Once filled and completely frozen solid, you can un-mold your pops. If the pops don’t come out of the mold easily, run the outside of the mold under hot water for a few seconds.

Nutrition Facts: 31 calories, 0.1 g fat, 8 mg sodium, 5.6 g carbohydrates, 1.1 g fiber, 2.3 g protein

http://theviewfromgreatisland.com/red-white-and-blueberry-popsicles/

 

 

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Get More Fruits and Veggies into Your Diet

Posted on: June 19, 2015

The Clever Cook:
How to Pack More Fruits and Veggies into Your Cooking

Fruit & Vegetable PlatterHave a picky eater at home? Or maybe you just don’t like fruits and veggies? Here are some “eat the rainbow” ways of sneaking fruits and veggies into your diet, making sure you get all your daily vitamins and minerals.

Red

• Add fresh chopped tomatoes into your jarred tomato sauce.
• Bake with applesauce into your baked goods, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Add red grapes, sliced radishes, pomegranate seeds, or sliced strawberries onto your salads.
• Make a smoothie with beets.
• Puree red peppers and add them to your tomato soup or sauce.
• Make a salad dressing using pink grapefruit.
• Add red chilies into your cooking for spice.

Yellow/Orange

• Add sweet potato or butternut squash puree into cheese sauces such as for mac and cheese or morning oatmeal.
• Add carrot puree into tomato sauces.
• Add pumpkin puree or mashed bananas into your baked goods, French toast, pancakes, and waffles instead of butter or oil.
• Have spaghetti squash instead of pasta. Here is how to cook a spaghetti squash: www.thekitchn.com/how-to-cook-spaghetti-squash-in-the-oven-cooking-lessons-from-the-kitchn-178036
• Make a smoothie with carrots or pumpkin puree.
• Make homemade salad dressing with orange or lemon juice.
• Grill pineapple and peaches on the barbeque for dessert.

Green

• Add a handful of chopped greens into your eggs or on top of your pizza.
• Puree a handful of spinach leaves and mix into your tomato sauce. Just a little won’t change the color!
• Use butter or romaine lettuce instead of bread for sandwiches.
• Add chopped greens or herbs into chopped meat for burgers and meatballs.
• Make low-fat zucchini muffins or pancakes, try this recipe: www.skinnytaste.com/2011/07/low-fat-chocolate-chip-zucchini-bread.html
• Bake with avocado instead of butter or oil.
• Add some zucchini puree into your cheesy pasta dishes (such as lasagna).
• Make a green smoothie with kale or spinach and citrus fruits.

Blue/Purple

• Mix in purple cabbage into your salad, tacos or stir-fry.
• Switch to purple potatoes for your mashed and add in pureed purple cauliflower.
• Grill plums on the barbeque for a sweet dessert or side dish.
• Cook with red onion instead of white or yellow.
• Add blackberries, blueberries or figs to your salads.
• Add pureed eggplant into tomato sauce or soup.
• Try sautéing purple kale or make kale chips.

What are the Health Benefits of Vitamin D

Posted on: May 20, 2015

Get the Details on Vitamin D

By Agnes Lu

Adequate vitamin D is important to your overall health for several reasons. It is essential for Grilled salmon with lemon isolated on whitestrong bones as it helps the body absorb calcium. It’s also needed for muscle movement, necessary for your nervous system and important to your immune system. Recent research shows that vitamin D may be key to the prevention of a number of long-term health problems such as cancer, type II diabetes and hypertension.

 

How much vitamin D do I need?
The amount of vitamin D needed depends on your age:
Birth – 12 months:                       400 IU/day
Age 1 – 70:                                     600 IU/day
Age 71 and older:                         800 IU/day
Pregnant and breastfeeding:     600 IU/day

How do I get vitamin D?
You can absorb vitamin D in three ways: through the skin, from diet, and from supplements.

Your body can produce vitamin D when your skin is sufficiently exposed to direct sunlight; however, unless you live in the South or Southwest, you are unlikely to get enough sunlight throughout the winter for your body to produce adequate amounts of vitamin D. Keep in mind, the American Academy of Dermatology does not recommend getting vitamin D from unprotected exposure to sunlight – which can increase your risk for skin cancer. Individuals with dark skin will absorb sunlight less efficiently.

There are a few foods that naturally contain vitamin D, and Americans get most of their vitamin D from fortified foods: milk, cereal, orange juice, and yogurt. If you’re looking for the natural sources of vitamin D, it can be found in fatty fish such as salmon, tuna and mackerel. In smaller amounts, it can be found in beef liver, cheese and egg yolks.

Am I at risk for vitamin D deficiency?
There are certain groups that have a higher risk of being vitamin D deficient:
• Breastfed infants
• Older adults
• Individuals with limited sun exposure
• Individuals with dark skin
• Individuals with inflammatory bowel disease and other conditions that cause fat malabsorption
If you think you might be vitamin D deficient, speak with your doctor.

Try these two salmon and egg dishes.

Lox, eggs and onions (Serves 4)

Modified from foodnetwork.com

Ingredients
1 large Spanish onion
1 tablespoons canola oil
3oz lox, chopped
8 eggs
Pinch of pepper

Directions
Cut the onion in half, then slice thinly. In a large saute pan, heat the oil over high heat, then saute the onions until lightly colored.
In a bowl, beat eggs with a fork, then add to the pan. When the eggs have set on the bottom, scramble in the lox and flip over.
Cook and scramble until just set.
Serve with fresh fruit or side salad for a complete breakfast or lunch.
Nutrition Facts (per serving): 220 calories, 14.1 g fat, 3.4 g saturated fat, 975 mg sodium, 4 g carbohydrates, 1 g fiber, 19 g protein

 

Scandinavian Eggs Benedict with Yogurt Sauce

courtesy of Gooseberry Mooseberry http://www.gooseberrymooseberry.com/2012/04/scandinavian-eggs-benedict-with-yogurt.html
(Serves 2)

Ingredients
1 cup low-fat Greek yogurt
1/8 tsp powdered turmeric
1 Tbsp chopped fresh dill
Juice of 1/2 lemon
1 tsp horseradish
A crackle of white pepper
2 whole wheat English muffins, halved and toasted
4 slices of smoked salmon
4 poached eggs
Optional: chopped chives for garnish

Directions
In a medium bowl, whisk together yogurt and turmeric until yogurt turns a pale gold color.
Then stir in dill, lemon juice, horseradish, and pepperuntil combined. Leave it at room temperature for a few minutes as you cook the eggs. If you would like the sauce warmer, put it in the microwave for about 30 seconds.
Top each toasted English muffin half with a slice of smoked salmon, a poached egg and a dollop of yogurt sauce. Sprinkle with chopped chives for garnish.
Serve with fresh fruit or side salad for a complete breakfast or lunch.
Nutrition Facts (per serving): 400 calories, 12 g total fat, 4 g saturated fat, 750 mg sodium, 51 g carbohydrates, 4.8 g fiber, 25 g protein

Editor’s Note: Agnes Lu, MS, RD, CDE, CDN

Mammograms: An Effective Tool in the Fight Against Breast Cancer

Posted on: May 13, 2015

Sandra Lee’s Diagnosis Has Many Women Asking: Should I Get a Mammogram?

Dr. Bonnie Litvack, Medical Director of the Women’s Imaging Center at Northern Westchester Hospital, answers questions many women have about when to start getting mammograms in light of the news that Food Network star and author Sandra Lee, who is Gov. Andrew Cuomo’s partner, has been diagnosed with breast cancer.

When should I start getting routine mammograms?
I, along with the American Cancer Society, recommend women start getting annual mammograms at the age of 40. I know there are differing opinions, but there is not a high incidence of breast cancer before the age of 40. There are some exceptions, of course, which I explain below.

What if I have a history of breast cancer in my family? Should I start getting mammograms earlier?
If you have a family history of breast cancer, whether it is your mother, aunt, or grandmother on either side of the family, you should start getting mammograms 10 years earlier than the age your family member was diagnosed. For example, if your mother was diagnosed with breast cancer at age 35, you should begin to get mammograms at age 25. However, 25 is the youngest age that I would recommend a woman get a mammogram. If your mother was diagnosed at age 30, I’d still recommend you begin getting mammograms at age 25.

What if I feel a lump in my breast?
Call your doctor and make an appointment. Your doctor will make recommendations about next steps, including getting a mammogram, if deemed necessary.

How long does a mammogram take, and does it hurt?
Typically a mammogram only takes a few minutes. While some patients experience some discomfort, they are in the minority, and if they feel any pain, we manage it.

What if I have no family history of breast cancer? Do I still need to get mammograms?
Absolutely. In fact, 75%-80% of breast cancer diagnoses are with women with no family history.

How effective are mammograms?
They are very effective. Since 1990, mammograms have helped decrease the death rate among breast cancer patients by 15%-40% depending on which studies you read. That is an impressive and encouraging number given that up until 1980, the death rate was steady. Mammograms are an incredibly effective tool to detect breast cancer early, or to rule it out.

Editor’s Note:
Under the leadership of Dr. Bonnie Litvak, the Women’s Imaging Center at Northern Westchester Hospital has been acclaimed as a Breast Imaging Center of Excellence by the American College of Radiology. She is fellowship trained in MRI and has extensive experience in all aspects of women’s imaging, including mammography.

Northern Westchester Hospital also offers 3-D mammography.

 

Protect Yourself from Skin Cancer Year-Round

Posted on: May 4, 2015

Surprising Facts About Year-Round Skin Cancer Risks…
…And Tips to Protect Yourself

By Dr. Stuart Zweibel

Did you know that skin cancer is the most common cancer in the United States? Now, a recent SunProtection_HiRezstudy from the Centers of Disease Control (CDC) finds an increase of 50 percent in the average annual number of adults treated for skin cancer. We all know how and when to protect our skin – or do we?  It’s essential to know the risk factors for skin cancer and the best forms of protection.  That’s particularly important during times, such as hazy days and winter, when many of us underestimate the risks to our skin from sun, and therefore relax our necessary safeguards.

Skin cancer occurs in two forms: melanoma and non-melanoma. Non-melanoma cancers, which are the most common, are almost always caused by sun exposure. For the more dangerous melanoma, genetics plays a larger role in determining your risk.

When we talk about sun exposure, we refer to the effect of three types of ultraviolet (UV) light – or radiation – on our skin: UVA, UVB and UVC. Skin cancer can develop when these skin-penetrating rays damage the DNA of our skin cells.

UVC is filtered out by the ozone layer. UVB causes sunburns and tans. While less UVA enters our atmosphere than UVB, it penetrates our skin deeply enough to potentially cause skin cancer. That’s why using “broad-spectrum” sunscreen is so important – only this type guards against both A and B.

Sunburn occurs when intense exposure to sun causes inflammation of the skin. Tanning is our body’s natural “sunscreen,” in which the skin’s pigment-producing cells increase production of pigment (in the form of the chemical compound melanin) to block harmful UV radiation. Sunburn is a visible sign of damage to the skin cells’ DNA. But while tanning may not produce inflammation, DNA damage has taken place.

The majority of people who develop a melanoma have a genetic predisposition to the disease.  For non-melanoma skin cancers, which are primarily caused by sun exposure, skin type becomes the dominant risk factor. You probably know that people with very pale or “porcelain” skin are at increased risk for skin damage from sun. In reality, four skin types are at greatest risk.  The first two will not surprise you – very pale skin that always burns and pale skin that tans minimally. But also vulnerable is skin that tans uniformly and only sometimes burns mildly, as well as skin that always gets the proverbial “beautiful” tan, with no burning.

Here is how I advise patients about skin cancer risks throughout the year,
and my best tips for protection:

Best year-round protection: Only use broad-spectrum protection with an SPF of 30 or higher. Even if a product is labeled as such, check that it contains the necessary ingredients meroxyl – sometimes called ecamsule – and avobenzone, which can be called parsol 1789. The Anthelios brand is one example of a very effective broad-spectrum sunscreen.

High-risk scenarios in winter:  Those enjoying outdoor sports in winter, particularly skiers and snowboarders, need to know that snow reflects UV rays and that higher altitudes mean slightly higher UV penetration. That makes sunscreen and lip protection vital, especially during spring skiing at higher altitudes. This is the case even when temperatures are low and it seems that sun exposure is not an issue. What’s more, winter’s low humidity and wind exposure can dry and irritate the skin, making moisturizers another key protection.

Are we at risk on overcast days? Radiation does penetrate on cloudier days. However, most people don’t realize that hazy days create significant UV ray exposure. People are fooled due to the seeming lack of intensity of the sun.

What times of day present greater risk from UV radiation?  During warm weather, the peak time is between 10 am and 4 pm. In winter in our latitude, peak UV radiation occurs around 11 am to 3 pm. That means you need sunscreen protection at certain times year-round.

When to apply: Sunscreen takes up to an hour to be fully effective. The biggest mistake people make is to get settled on the beach, and only after 15 minutes, have someone apply sunscreen to their back. By then, they will probably develop a burn from the exposure.

How much to apply: Most people apply far too little sunscreen. The average adult needs approximately one ounce to be protected.

Where to apply: Everywhere that is exposed – make sure to get it in your ears and behind your ears.  Protecting the nose is critical. 15 to 20 percent of all skin cancers occur on the nose. Protect your lips with balm or Chapstick with sun protection. If your clothing is sheer, apply sunscreen to your entire body. Wear sunglasses, a hat and protective clothing.

Protecting children:  Do not use sunscreen on babies under one year old. If needed, use protective clothing and consider using a non-chemical sunblock. However, be aware of recent suggestions that certain chemical-free blocks are ground so finely, they might enter the skin. So ask your pediatrician’s advice before using this type of sunblock on a child.

 

Editor’s Note:
By Stuart Zweibel, MD, PhD, is a board certified dermatologist and dermatologic surgeon specializing in skin cancer, laser surgery and cosmetic dermatology. Dr. Zweibel served as the Chief of the Division of Dermatology at Northern Westchester Hospital from 1999 to 2007. He has been recognized as a ‘Best Doctor’ in both New York Magazine and Westchester Magazine.

Dr Stuart Zweibel | Dermatologist Scarsdale NY | Mount Kisco NYDr. Zweibel is a graduate of Cornell University and completed his graduate studies at Temple University School of Medicine and Harvard School of Public Health earning a PhD in Microbiology and Immunology.

He graduated from Mount Sinai School of Medicine. He completed his residency at Brown University and a fellowship in Mohs and Dermatologic Surgery under Dr. Mohs in the department of Surgery at the University of Wisconsin Hospital.