Category Archives: Cancer Treatment & Wellness Center

Ask the Urologist: What You Need to Know about PSA and the Increase of Metastatic Prostate Cancer in the US

Posted on: August 19, 2016

By Dr. Warren Bromberg  

In 2012, the US Preventative Services Task Force (USPSTF) stunned the medical and lay community with its recommendation against routine prostate-specific antigen tests or, PSA screenings, for prostate cancer. This screening can detect high levels of PSA that may indicate the presence of prostate cancer. The Task Force gave PSA screening a grade of “D” primarily based on the results of the Prostate, Lung, Colorectal, and Ovary (PCLO) trial, reported in 2009, which showed no difference in prostate cancer incidence or mortality between the screening and control groups after 7 years. Since this seminal declaration, screening has decreased from 33% to 18.7% in men aged 55-69 years, the age range generally thought to be most critical in identifying and treating the second-leading cause of cancer death in men.

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Endometrial Cancer: Reducing Your Risk

Posted on: March 15, 2016

Endometrial Cancer: Reducing Your Risk

By Dr. Iris Wertheim

Unlike breast cancer, endometrial cancer is not often the focus of media

 Iris Wertheim, MD Director of the Gynecologic Oncology Program, Northern Westchester Hospital


Iris Wertheim, MD
Director of the Gynecologic Oncology Program, Northern Westchester Hospital

attention, and is rarely cited as a health consequence of obesity. So you may be surprised to learn that endometrial cancer – cancer of the lining of the uterus – is the most common gynecological cancer in the U.S, and that there is a known link between obesity and this disease. Here, I raise your awareness of endometrial cancer, and offer empowering advice to every woman about reducing her risk.

Endometrial cancer arises in the glands of the lining of the uterus. It is the most prevalent gynecological cancer in the United States, affecting 50,000 women annually.

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Lung Cancer Screening Detects Cancer Sooner

Posted on: November 3, 2015

Westchester Thoracic Surgery Chief on the Advanced Lung Cancer Screening that’s Saving Record Numbers of Lives

By Christos Stavropoulos, MD, FACS, Chief of the Thoracic Surgery Division and Director of the Lung Cancer Program at the Cancer Treatment and Wellness Center at Northern Westchester Hospital

You may know that lung cancer is the number one cause of cancer death in the U.S. (and worldwide).*  But you may not know that an advanced type of screening — the Low-Dose CT Scan – is reducing lung cancer deaths by 20 percent.* Its effectiveness makes this scan today’s “standard of care” for those at high risk; and it is newly covered by Medicare and most health insurance plans. Read on to see if you meet the screening criteria, and to learn how Northern Westchester Hospital (NWH) makes sure every eligible person can afford this test.

Who should get a Low-Dose CT screening?

If you meet each of these criteria, Low-Dose CT (LDCT) lung cancer screening, which is conducted at NWH, may be right for you:

  • You are between 55 and 74 years old;
  • You have a smoking history of 30 pack years. That means you smoke (or smoked) one pack daily for 30 years, two packs daily for 15 years, or three packs daily for 10 years;
  • You currently smoke or quit within the past 15 years;
  • You have no symptoms of lung cancer.

What exactly is LDCT screening?

LDCT lung cancer screening is a new form of traditional CT (computed tomography) imaging technology that uses a very low dose of radiation to provide critical 3-D information about the lungs. It is unprecedented in its ability to detect ever-smaller lung cancers called nodules – small lesions or defects in lung tissue that can represent early cancers. The life-saving power of earlier detection can’t be overstated. When we catch cancer early — when it is smallest — we can have the most impact on prognosis and survival. According to the American Cancer Society, LDCT screening is shown to prevent up to 12,000 deaths from lung cancer a year in the US.

Why is getting screened so essential?

Screening for lung cancer is particularly vital, as this cancer presents no symptoms in its early stage. Here’s why: The lung is a relatively large organ. Picture a marble floating within a big balloon. For the marble to have a noticeable impact, it must become bigger. Only when that marble becomes the size of an acorn or an orange, do symptoms develop. There may be pain as the now-bigger growth presses against neighboring lung tissue or blood vessels; or a persistent cough can develop from its pressure against the airways. That is why a person harboring early-stage lung cancer usually reports they “feel fine,” and precisely why screening is necessary and effective.

What are the chances of something being found?

Most screening results are negative. The overwhelming majority of nodules are benign. Fewer than three percent of those screened will need intervention in the form of a biopsy. Of those people, only a small percentage wind up having cancer. That’s the point: We are looking for those few people with lung cancer. As with any screening, a small number of false positives can lead to unnecessary diagnostic biopsies. However, every biopsy performed at Northern Westchester Hospital is done using the most up-to-date, minimally invasive method possible. When lung cancer is diagnosed, NWH offers comprehensive oncologic care second to none.

How affordable is the LDCT screening?

Medicare now covers LDCT screening and commercial insurers are moving toward coverage. But what if you meet the eligibility criteria, and don’t have commercial insurance or Medicare? NWH can help — with a wide range of payment options and below-average pricing. We will work with you. If you can benefit from the screening, we make sure you get it.

Steps to take

If you believe you meet the screening criteria, speak to your primary care physician about ordering an LDCT. If you don’t have a physician who can refer, NWH’s nurse practitioner will perform a comprehensive assessment, determine eligibility and order an LDCT if necessary. NWH is going the extra mile to make this potentially life-saving screening 100 percent accessible to everyone who needs it.

*National Institutes of Health (NIH)

To learn more about the Lung Cancer Screening Program or to make an appointment with our Nurse Practitioner, call 914-242-7695 from 8:30 am to 4:30 pm.  

Catching Lung Cancer Early

Posted on: October 26, 2015

A Story of Hope…

Dr. Christos StavropoulosAlthough my patient quit smoking six years ago, she remained at high risk for lung cancer. When a Low-Dose CT screening showed something like a little marble in her lung, I recommended a surgical biopsy. But my patient hesitated, feeling “very nervous” about the procedure. When I gently told her that “If it were my mother, this is the advice I’d give her,” she agreed to proceed.

During the operation, I extracted a piece of lung with the nodule to obtain the diagnosis. When it tested positive for cancer, I performed a lobectomy during the same procedure, sparing my patient a second exposure to anesthesia. Afterwards, she was immensely relieved that her cancer was removed, and very pleased to be “up and around” almost immediately after the minimally invasive procedure.

Today, my patient is incredibly grateful that her cancer was found at stage 1A, and that, as a result, she didn’t need radiation or chemotherapy, just ongoing surveillance CT scans.

This is the best possible scenario for someone with lung cancer. Because we caught her cancer early, she has a real chance for a cure.

To see if you’re a candidate for low-dose CT scans, take this self-assessment.

Editor’s Note:  Dr. Stavropoulos is the Director of the Lung Cancer Program at the Cancer Treatment & Wellness Center at Northern Westchester Hospital

The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Posted on: June 22, 2015

The Patriotic Plate – Red, White and Blue Superfoods

Amy Rosenfeld, MS RD CDN

This 4th of July, celebrate our country’s independence with good health and a patriotic plate. American flagRed, white, and blue foods are superfoods: nutrition powerhouses packed full of rich antioxidants and phytonutrients.

Red fruits and vegetables like strawberries, tomatoes, and pomegranate, are full of phytonutrients, anthocyanins, flavonoid compounds; nutrients that reduce cancer by fighting free radicals and preventing oxidative damage to cells. Red fruits and veggies are particularly high in the phytochemical lycopene, shown to reduce the risk of prostate cancer.

White foods often get a bad reputation but fresh white foods, such as daikon radish, turnips, jicama or pears, are packed with nutrients. The anthoxanthins in white foods can reduce inflammation of all kinds.  One of the most common anthoxanthins, quercetin, is linked with lowering the risk of heart disease and cancer, easing the symptoms of allergies, and helping with pain from arthritis.

Blue and purple fruits and vegetables like blueberries, beets, and eggplant, have rich doses of phytonutrients and flavonoids that lower your risk of heart disease. Flavonoids may also help improve memory with aging and prevent many cancers.

Try out these easy recipes for your 4th of July this year. These recipes are perfect for a party, cookout or relaxing picnic.
Grilled Chicken with Red & Blueberry Salsa 

(Adapted from All Through The Year Cheer)
(Yield:  4 servings)

Ingredients:
4 (6 oz) chicken breasts, pounded to even thickness
1 tbsp olive oil (for grilling the chicken)
½ tsp pepper
½ tsp salt
1 c fresh blueberries, chopped
1/2 red bell pepper, seed and diced
1/4 red onion, diced
1 jalapeno pepper, seeded and minced (optional)
3 TB fresh minced parsley
2 TB fresh minced mint
1 TB lemon juice

Directions:
1) In a bowl, stir together all ingredients for the salsa and refrigerate until ready to use (you can make this up to 1 day in advance but if you do so, I recommend waiting until right before you serve it to add the fresh minced herbs).
2) Lightly brush olive oil on both sides of the chicken breast, then season both sides with salt and pepper.  Grill the chicken until fully cooked (there should not be any pink).
3) Serve the grilled chicken topped with salsa.

https://allthroughtheyearcheer.wordpress.com/2010/06/25/grilled-chicken-with-red-blueberry-salsa/

Nutrition Facts: 278 calories, 12.2 g fat, 2.8 g saturated fat, 393 mg sodium, 7.7 g carbohydrates, 1.8 g fiber, 33.6 g protein
Cous-Cous & Fruit Salad

(Courtesy of Eatingwell.com)
(serves 4)

Ingredients:
2 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil
2 tablespoons orange juice
1 tablespoon cider vinegar
2 teaspoons finely chopped shallots
1/4 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon freshly ground pepper
2 cups cooked whole-wheat couscous
1 cup chopped nectarine
1 cup mixed fresh berries, such as blueberries and raspberries
2 tablespoons toasted sliced almonds

Directions:
1. Whisk oil, orange juice, vinegar, shallots, salt and pepper in a large bowl. Add cooked couscous, nectarines, berries and almonds; gently toss to combine.

Nutrition Facts: 259 calories; 9 g fat; 1 g sat; 40 g carbohydrates; 7 g protein; 7 g fiber; 146 mg sodium

http://www.eatingwell.com/recipes_menus/recipe_slideshows/healthy_red_white_and_blue_recipes?slide=15

 

Red, White and Blue Yogurt Popsicles

(Adapted from The View from Great Island)
Yield: 10 popsicles

Ingredients:
1 cup raspberries
1 cup blueberries
1 cup vanilla flavored Greek yogurt

Directions:
1. Using a small food processor, or blender, puree the raspberries until smooth. Set aside. Repeat for the blueberries.
2. Put your popsicle mold in the freezer and freeze till firm, at least an hour, or more.
3. Layer a little bit of the blueberry puree into the mold. Put in the freezer for 10-20 minutes until solid. Alternate with layers, putting in the freezer for 10 minutes in between each layer.
4. When done layering, insert the popsicle sticks. Make sure to get the stick a little bit into the frozen layer so they will stand straight. Put back into the freezer until solid.
5. Once filled and completely frozen solid, you can un-mold your pops. If the pops don’t come out of the mold easily, run the outside of the mold under hot water for a few seconds.

Nutrition Facts: 31 calories, 0.1 g fat, 8 mg sodium, 5.6 g carbohydrates, 1.1 g fiber, 2.3 g protein

http://theviewfromgreatisland.com/red-white-and-blueberry-popsicles/