Category Archives: Hospital Services

Northern Westchester Hospital provides services for everybody’s health need.

Northern Westchester Hospital Chief of Endocrinology on Diabetes, Weight Loss, Healthcare Costs

Posted on: September 24, 2014

Adults with Type 2 Diabetes: Weight Loss Lowers Healthcare Costs

By Dr. Jeffrey Powell

A recent study found that overweight individuals with diabetes who lose weight by dieting and increasing their physical activity can reduce their healthcare costs by an average of more than $500 a year. While we always look at better health outcomes through diet and exercise, this is the first study to show that weight loss can save money. The findings were published in the journal Diabetes Care.

This makes a lot of sense. If an individual with diabetes can lose weight, he or she will likely see fewer and shorter hospital stays, and could eventually end up on less medication. That’s not only good for one’s health, but for the wallet.

At the Division of Endocrinology at Northern Westchester Hospital, we regularly encourage our diabetes patients to see a nutritionist. Patients are counseled to eat healthy. This includes limiting the portions of food high in carbohydrates, which when broken down they can raise glucose levels. We also advise patients to avoid fried foods and juices that can affect blood sugar levels.

Physical activity and regular follow-up medical appointments are also encouraged so that we can work together with our patients to achieve the greatest possible health outcome for them.

Aside from the study mentioned above, it is also very important to note that many people with type 2 diabetes are not aware that they have it. Individuals who are overweight and who have high cholesterol and high blood pressure should get checked. This is because cardiovascular disease is a main complication of diabetes.

Managing weight is also important because many malignancies are associated with obesity. According to the National Cancer Institute, obesity is tied to the occurrence of cancers of the esophagus, breast, colon, rectum, kidney, pancreas, gall bladder, thyroid, and possibly others.
One thing that many people who struggle with their weight know is that trying to lose weight is a full time job. What many people do not know is that the body naturally works against weight loss. But there are a variety of ways that our dedicated team can help.

The Center for Diabetes at Northern Westchester Hospital is dedicated to providing a wide range of services and programs for people with diabetes.

In addition to supporting the needs of inpatients, the Center offers a comprehensive outpatient education program that focuses on meeting the individual needs of persons living with diabetes and their families. The Center also sponsors a monthly diabetes support group for adult patients to help them achieve their best possible health outcomes.

Editor’s Note:  Jeffrey Powell, MD is Chief of the Division of Endocrinology at Northern Westchester Hospital

Attend the monthly Diabetes Support Group at Northern Westchester Hospital. Discussion topics are developed around the American Association of Diabetes Educators Seven Self Care Behaviors such as healthy eating, being active, medication, monitoring, reducing risk, healthy coping and problem solving. Guest speakers often include dietitians, pharmacists, exercise physiologist and other specialists. Contact Meagan Sullivan, RN, MSN, Diabetes Educator at 914-666-1861 to register.

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Northern Westchester Hospital Pediatric Pulmonologist on Kids and Asthma

Posted on: September 22, 2014

Managing Childhood Asthma

by Lynne Quittell, MD

The soft wheeze or whistle as a child breathes. The chin tucked and chest pinched as he coughs incessantly. These are signs of childhood asthma, a maddening, frightening condition for kids and parents — and a leading cause of ER visits for children. While in the past asthma has been difficult to treat and manage, advancements in medications and methods have allowed doctors and families to tame this potentially dangerous condition in children.

The reasons why a child develops asthma can be murky. Potential triggers can be allergies, exposure to secondhand smoke, or a family history of asthma. Premature babies who spend time on a ventilator appear to be at higher risk.

The reason a child struggles to breathe is that the airways can easily become inflamed, muscles that support the airways can constrict, and mucus production can increase. Some kids will have exercise-induced asthma while others may find allergy season to be the source of troubles. Even a sudden change  in temperature or a rise in humidity can set off an attack.

Parents and children should work with their doctor to develop a treatment and medication plan. This is the aspect of asthma treatment that has really changed over the years. The medications have improved greatly. We teach children and parents to recognize the earliest signs of an attack, and encourage them to treat symptoms promptly — before they worsen. I like to use the analogy of smoke in the kitchen… You wouldn’t just let it go — you’d address it immediately. Asthma is the same: Stop the attack before the symptoms become more difficult to control.

When setting up a plan, a doctor must take into consideration the child’s triggers and needs. During the spring or fall allergy season, some children will require a daily preventive medication to minimize airway inflammation, while others may be okay using an inhaler to treat occasional flare ups linked to exercise. The next step is managing more serious flare ups, and then knowing when to seek emergency help. No one leaves my office without a written treatment plan. “It’s one of the most important aspects of asthma care.

Children whose asthma isn’t responding to treatment can benefit from pulmonary exercise program, similar to what is offered at Northern Westchester Hospital. An effective program would involve exercise and respiratory therapists who would create a program for your child to help him or her build physical strength and exercise capacity. The plan should be specifically tailored to your child’s needs and include education and advice for caregivers. The goal? To get your child to the point where they can play and partake in activities with their peers, without limitations.

With the excellent treatment available, I expect my patients to be able to take part in all age-appropriate activities with no restrictions.

Editor’s Notes:
Lynne Quittell, MD, is a pediatric pulmonologist who specializes in pediatric asthma at Northern Westchester Hospital

Did you know…
Asthma affects 7 million children under the age of 18.*
*Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

Study: Genetic Testing for Ashkenazi Jews

Posted on: September 10, 2014

Study: Ashkenazi Jewish Descent as a Criterion for Genetic Testing
by Nancy Cohen, MS, CGC

Nancy Cohen Genetic Counselor WestchesterA new study, Population-based screening for breast and ovarian cancer risk due to BRCA1 and BRCA2 (abstract available in PubMed), suggests that population screening of Ashkenazi Jews for BRCA mutations may be beneficial because the cancer risks of those without a family history suggestive of a BRCA gene mutation were shown to be very similar cancer risks to those with such a history.

Since 2.5% of Ashkenazi Jews harbor BRCA mutations, and increased cancer surveillance and cancer risk reduction have been shown to improve outcomes for mutation carriers, such screening may have a useful role in this population. It will be interesting to see whether or not the guidelines from the NCCN will be adjsted to reflect this study.

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Study Shows Exercise Lowers Risk of Breast Cancer and Recurrence

Posted on: September 4, 2014

Take a Walk and Reduce Your Risk

A recent study found that postmenopausal women, who in the past four years had undertaken regular physical activity equivalent to at least four hours of walking per week, had a lower risk for invasive breast cancer compared with women who exercised less during those four years, according to data published in Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, a journal of the American Association for Cancer Research.

At the Breast Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital, we encourage the entire health and wellness of our patients, whether it is prior to diagnosis, all the way through survivorship of breast cancer.

As part of the care we provide, we discuss prevention with our patients, as well as prevention of recurrence of breast cancer.  A sedentary lifestyle can impact a patient’s risk for developing breast cancer, so we encourage all of our patients to add exercise such as walking or bicycling to their regular routines if they are not already doing so.

A combination of exercise and a healthy diet will also help manage weight, another risk factor tied to developing breast cancer.  The following tips could help reduce developing breast cancer, as well as work to prevent developing a recurrence in our survivor population:

•    Regular exercise (walking, bicycling);
•    Weight reduction, if applicable;
•    Stop smoking.

This is good advice for all people, and it certainly applies to lowering one’s risk of developing breast cancer or a recurrence.

It is important that you have access to a full spectrum of experts skilled in the latest advancements in breast health.  Our team of dedicated professionals includes geneticists, radiologists, oncologists, cancer and reconstructive surgeons, integrative medicine practitioners and oncology nurses, each with experience and expertise in restoring women to their best possible health.

Editor’s Note: Dr. Philip Bonanno is Director of The Breast Institute at Northern Westchester Hospital

Dr. Forcade on a Promising Treatment to Help Patients Battling Metastatic Liver Cancer

Posted on: August 25, 2014

When There is No Cancer Cure, There Can be ‘Cancer Control’

Carlos Forcade, MD

Chief, Interventional Radiology, Northern Westchester Hospital

Some radical cancer therapies are being replaced in favor of treatments that honor a person’s wish for quality of life over prolongation of poor life.

One example is an interventional radiology treatment at Northern Westchester Hospital using trans arterial radioembolization, or TARE.  TARE shows promise in prolonging quality of life for many patients battling liver cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer in the liver.

This unique interventional treatment delivers Yttrium-90, a radioactive isotope, directly to a tumor through the vascular system. It is a scientifically sophisticated technique for giving NWH patients a cancer treatment that doesn’t harm the healthy cells.

First, What is Interventional Radiology?

A subspecialty of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology uses image guidance to perform minimally invasive procedures to treat a wide range of diseases.

Better Outcome for Our Patients

More than three-fourths of liver cancer patients can’t have surgery; TARE with Yttrium-90 gives patients more time.  And as an interventional radiology procedure, it offers the benefits of a minimally invasive treatment:

  •    Reduced infection rates, risk, pain and recovery time
  •    Shorter hospital stays
  •    Uses under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia

TARE with Yttrium-90 is an advanced treatment that is invaluable for patients with primary and secondary malignancies of the liver who have previously exhausted or who do not have other options in combating their liver cancer.

How TARE with Yttrium-90 Works

Tumors need a blood supply, which they actively generate, to feed themselves and grow. Interventional radiologists are uniquely skilled in using the vascular system to deliver targeted treatments via catheter throughout the body. In treating cancer patients, Interventional Radiologists can attack the tumor from inside the body without medicating or affecting other parts of the body.

Combining the radioactive isotope Yttrium-90 (also known as Y-90) into microspheres to deliver radiation directly to a tumor allows for a higher, local dose of radiation to be used-without subjecting healthy tissue in the body to the radiation.

 trans arterial radioembolization Northern Westchester HospitalEach microsphere is about the size of five red blood cells in width. These beads are injected through a catheter from the groin into the liver artery supplying the tumor. The beads become lodged within the tumor vessels where they exert their local radiation that kills the cancer cells. Y-90 radiates from within and is administered via the hepatic artery. Y-90 treatment is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of inoperable liver cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer in the liver.

While this advanced treatment doesn’t cure liver cancer, the lives of patients at NWH are being extended and their quality of life is improved with Yttrium-90 microsphere treatment.

The Team Approach at NWH

Paramount to the application of this leading-edge treatment is the multidisciplinary collaboration at Northern Westchester Hospital between the Interventional Radiology Department and the Radiation Oncology Department, led by Dr. Alfred Tinger, Chief of Radiation Oncology in The Cancer Treatment and Wellness Center.

There are other interventional radiology treatments available at Northern Westchester Hospital that are used to treat primary liver cancer, as well as other cancers that have metastasized in the liver, such as colorectal cancer, breast cancer, gynecologic cancers, melanoma, and others. These nonsurgical interventional radiology treatments are:

  • Trans arterial embolization (TAE)
  • Trans arterial chemoembolization (TACE), which delivers chemotherapy directly to the liver
  • Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), which kills the tumor with heat to treat the cancer locally.

Editor’s Note:  Carlos Forcade, MD, is Director of Interventional Radiology at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mt. Kisco, NY.  For more information or for a referral please call the Interventional Radiology Department at 914.242.8154

NWH is one of only 5 Hospitals in New York State to offer Yttrium-90 therapy for the treatment of liver cancer. (The other hospitals are: Memorial Sloane-Kettering, NYU, Mt. Sinai and NY Presbyterian.)