Category Archives: Expert Health Advice

Study: Genetic Testing for Ashkenazi Jews

Posted on: September 10, 2014

Study: Ashkenazi Jewish Descent as a Criterion for Genetic Testing
by Nancy Cohen, MS, CGC

Nancy Cohen Genetic Counselor WestchesterA new study, Population-based screening for breast and ovarian cancer risk due to BRCA1 and BRCA2 (abstract available in PubMed), suggests that population screening of Ashkenazi Jews for BRCA mutations may be beneficial because the cancer risks of those without a family history suggestive of a BRCA gene mutation were shown to be very similar cancer risks to those with such a history.

Since 2.5% of Ashkenazi Jews harbor BRCA mutations, and increased cancer surveillance and cancer risk reduction have been shown to improve outcomes for mutation carriers, such screening may have a useful role in this population. It will be interesting to see whether or not the guidelines from the NCCN will be adjsted to reflect this study.

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Northern Westchester Hospital Dietitian Shares Tips to Prevent Foodborne Illnesses

Posted on: August 28, 2014

Keeping Your Food Safe

By Stephanie Perruzza, MS, RD, CDN

Stephanie Perruzza MS, RD, CDN Northern Westchester Hospital

Every year, one in six Americans (about 48 million) gets sick from foodborne illnesses and 128,000 are hospitalized, according to the Center of Disease Control. The good news is most foodborne illnesses can be prevented with simple food safety tips. September is National Food Safety Month, which focuses on the importance of increasing food safety awareness.

Children, pregnant women, and those with weakened immune systems are often more susceptible to foodborne illness. To reduce your risk, follow these simple steps: Continue reading

Dr. Forcade on a Promising Treatment to Help Patients Battling Metastatic Liver Cancer

Posted on: August 25, 2014

When There is No Cancer Cure, There Can be ‘Cancer Control’

Carlos Forcade, MD

Chief, Interventional Radiology, Northern Westchester Hospital

Some radical cancer therapies are being replaced in favor of treatments that honor a person’s wish for quality of life over prolongation of poor life.

One example is an interventional radiology treatment at Northern Westchester Hospital using trans arterial radioembolization, or TARE.  TARE shows promise in prolonging quality of life for many patients battling liver cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer in the liver.

This unique interventional treatment delivers Yttrium-90, a radioactive isotope, directly to a tumor through the vascular system. It is a scientifically sophisticated technique for giving NWH patients a cancer treatment that doesn’t harm the healthy cells.

First, What is Interventional Radiology?

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Northern Westchester Hospital Chief of Dermatology Talks Skin Cancer and Melanoma

Posted on: July 31, 2014

Melanoma: The black sheep of the family

By Dr. Ross Levy

Of the three common types of skin cancer, melanoma is the most worrisome. This aggressive cancer is deadly when caught late. Skin cancer in general is on the rise: Fifty years ago, one in 2000 people developed a melanoma. Now it’s one in 35. By gaining a better understanding of melanoma and its causes, you remove some of the scare and can protect yourself. Continue reading

Northern Westchester Hospital Chief of Pediatrics Discusses New Vaccination Requirements in New York

Posted on: July 22, 2014

Back-to-School Preparations May Need to Include Vaccinations
By Dr. Pete Richel

Your child may need a new vaccination before classes start this fall. For the first time in more than a decade, New York State has updated its school immunization requirements, and now children must be vaccinated twice against varicella—chicken pox.

Image courtesy of Sura Nualpradid / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Sura Nualpradid / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Prior to July of this year, parents could opt out of the second chicken pox vaccine. Why the shift? After all, many adults may remember chicken pox parties from their youth: Mothers would take children to visit a sick kid so that their children would be exposed, get ill, and gain immunity. Although chicken pox can be relatively mild, it can also cause permanent scarring and in some cases turn deadly. As recently as 10 years ago—before use of the vaccine was widespread—the US had as many as 100 deaths a year from chicken pox. From a public health perspective and from mine as a doctor, one death is too many. If we can eliminate this risk, we should seize that opportunity.

There have been some other minor changes to the immunization requirements, such as stipulating a schedule of three to five polio vaccinations before starting school. This has to do with timing. If your child has received the required three polio vaccines in infancy, they must still receive one at the time of school entrance. Three are required, and four are recommended for complete immunization. In either case, one must be received between the ages of 4 and 6. The new requirements—which will be phased in over the next seven years—apply to students starting daycare, Head Start, nursery, pre-kindergarten, and grades kindergarten through 12. If you’ve already taken your children for their wellness visit and vaccinations—or you’re not sure if your child is vaccinated against chicken pox—contact your pediatrician.

Editor’s Note: Dr. Peter Richel, MD, FAAP is Chief of Pediatrics at Northern Westchester Hospital.