Category Archives: Expert Health Advice

Tips for Reducing Salt in Your Diet

Posted on: March 14, 2014

Spice it Up and Toss the Salt

Kimberly Stein, RD, CDN

In today’s food culture, most of us are consuming far too much sodium. The current recommendation for sodium according to the 2010 Dietary Guidelines for Americans is less than 2,300 milligrams per day. That’s equivalent to about the size of one teaspoon. The recommendation for African Americans, individuals age 51 and older and anyone with high blood pressure, diabetes, or kidney disease is no more than 1,500 milligrams each day.

Yes, it’s true that we do need sodium in our body for normal functions, such as maintaining blood pressure. However, it’s when our sodium intake skyrockets that it can become dangerous causing hypertension (high blood pressure), or fluid retention in people with certain medical conditions, but controlling the amount in your diet may be easier than you think. Here are some simple tips to keep your sodium intake in check: Continue reading

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Help for Daylight Saving Time Sleep Problems

Posted on: March 6, 2014

Spring Forward with Ease

By Dr. Praveen Rudraraju, Director, Center for Sleep Medicine, Northern Westchester Hospital

Dr. Rudrarju PraveenThe hour time change will affect some people more than others due to difficulty adjusting their circadian rhythm. By altering the clock our internal clock becomes out of sync or mismatched with our current day-night cycle. Here are a few tips that might help you ‘spring ahead’ with ease: Continue reading

Adjusting to Daylight Saving Time for Children

Posted on: March 5, 2014

Sweat Dreams

By Dr. Lewis Kass, Pediatric Sleep Specialist, Northern Westchester Hospital

Kass,(Lewis J. Kass, MD)Children’s busy schedules may have more of an impact on their sleep than daylight saving time.

In today’s world the one hour time change is the smallest of the issues that affect our children’s ability to get to sleep. Most school-age children are so over scheduled that they come home exhausted. From school to swim or basketball or soccer practice to piano lessons to homework then ending the day with television or video games or tablet time, a child’s day should’ve ended long before a bedtime that is frequently later than it should be.

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New York Dietitian Gives Tips on Healthy Snacking

Posted on: February 26, 2014

National Snack Food Month

by Stephanie Perruzza, MS, RD, CDN, Northern Westchester Hospital

89792455compr-nutrition monthYes, you read this title correctly. There is a National Snack Food Month, and it’s in February. Snack foods tend to get a bad rep with stereotypical offerings like chips, cookies and soda on frequent advertisements. The good news is that snacking can fit into a healthy diet and lifestyle – just be sure to keep these few tips in mind:

  1. Calorie Control – you don’t want to overdo it and have your snack turn into a meal. Portion your snacks out and keep them between 150-225 calories.
  2. Snack Wisely – Choose nutritious food choices (see our examples below) and don’t snack mindlessly. When your mind is preoccupied, you eat more; so sit down and focus on your meal and hunger/fullness feelings. Continue reading

New York Nursery Nurse Discusses Newborn Screening and PKU

Posted on: February 20, 2014

Why Will My Newborn Get a PKU Screening?

By Martha Zavras, RN III, Northern Westchester Hospital

Northern Westchester Hospital maternityIf you, a family member, or close friend is pregnant, it is important to know that your newborn will be screened for several serious medical conditions, as mandated by New York State. Among the conditions screened is PKU. What is this blood test for, and what do the results mean for your new baby and your family?

As a Nursery nurse, I often administer the PKU test to newborns, also explaining to parents why it must be given so early in life. PKU is the abbreviation for phenylketonuria, a metabolic disorder. In New York State, the PKU screen, which is a simple blood test, also screens for many other disorders, including thyroid problems and some types of anemia.

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