Category Archives: Expert Health Advice

Northern Westchester Hospital Dietitian Shares Tips to Prevent Foodborne Illnesses

Posted on: August 28, 2014

Keeping Your Food Safe

By Stephanie Perruzza, MS, RD, CDN

Every year, one in six Americans (about 48 million) gets sick from foodborne illnesses and 128,000 are hospitalized, according to the Center of Disease Control. The good news is most foodborne illnesses can be prevented with simple food safety tips. September is National Food Safety Month, which focuses on the importance of increasing food safety awareness.

Children, pregnant women, and those with weakened immune systems are often more susceptible to foodborne illness. To reduce your risk, follow these simple steps:

 

Clean
• Clean your hands and all cooking surfaces (counters, utensils, cutting boards) with hot soapy water before preparing or eating meals
• Consider paper towels to clean surfaces; if you use cloth towels wash them often.
Cook
• Use a food thermometer to cook foods to proper internal temperatures, for example poultry should reach an internal temperature of 165°F and fish to 145°F.
• Bring sauces, soups and gravies to a boil when reheating. Heat other leftovers thoroughly to 165°F.
Chill
• Keep your refrigerator at 40°F or below and your freezer 0°F or below to reduce risk of foodborne illness.
• Never defrost at room temperature.  Three safe methods to thaw are: in the refrigerator, in cold water or in the microwave. If you are thawing in cold water or the microwave food must be cooked immediately.
Separate
• Separate raw items (poultry, seafood) from other food items in grocery bags and in your refrigerator. Store raw items on shelving below cooked or ready to eat items.
• Use separate cutting boards for items like fresh produce and raw meats. I find that color-coded cutting boards (green for veggies, red for meats) work best to help prevent cross-contamination.

Myth Busters:
Below are some common food safety myths:
MYTH: Glass or plastic cutting boards don’t hold harmful bacteria like wooden cutting boards do.
FACT: ALL cutting boards can be a breeding ground for bacteria regardless of type.  It’s important to wash and sanitize after each use. Solid plastic and glass are dishwasher safe; however, wooden don’t hold up very well. Once cutting boards become old with cracks and excessive knife scares it’s time to dispose.
MYTH: Rinsing my hands under running water kills germs.
FACT: Water with soap is the best way to wash your hands and remove harmful bacteria. Be sure to scrub both the front and back of your hands under running water. Sing Twinkle, Twinkle Little Star twice (about 30 seconds) to ensure your hands are clean, dry with a clean MYTH: Pre-packaged produce does not need to be washed before eating.
FACT: Just because produce is pre-packaged doesn’t mean that it’s ready to eat. Ready the label to make sure it states, “ready to eat” or “triple washed,” if it does you’re good to go!

FightBac!® is a campaign created by a non-profit organization called Partnership for Food Safety Education. It aims at improving public health and food safety by bringing together health educators and other partnered organizations to increase awareness and reduce the risk of foodborne illness. For more information on food safety please check out the following credible websites:
www.FightBac.org
www.FoodSafety.gov
www.HomeFoodSafety.org

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Dr. Forcade on a Promising Treatment to Help Patients Battling Metastatic Liver Cancer

Posted on: August 25, 2014

When There is No Cancer Cure, There Can be ‘Cancer Control’

Carlos Forcade, MD

Chief, Interventional Radiology, Northern Westchester Hospital

Some radical cancer therapies are being replaced in favor of treatments that honor a person’s wish for quality of life over prolongation of poor life.

One example is an interventional radiology treatment at Northern Westchester Hospital using trans arterial radioembolization, or TARE.  TARE shows promise in prolonging quality of life for many patients battling liver cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer in the liver.

This unique interventional treatment delivers Yttrium-90, a radioactive isotope, directly to a tumor through the vascular system. It is a scientifically sophisticated technique for giving NWH patients a cancer treatment that doesn’t harm the healthy cells.

First, What is Interventional Radiology?

A subspecialty of Diagnostic Radiology, Interventional Radiology uses image guidance to perform minimally invasive procedures to treat a wide range of diseases.

Better Outcome for Our Patients

More than three-fourths of liver cancer patients can’t have surgery; TARE with Yttrium-90 gives patients more time.  And as an interventional radiology procedure, it offers the benefits of a minimally invasive treatment:

  •    Reduced infection rates, risk, pain and recovery time
  •    Shorter hospital stays
  •    Uses under local anesthesia instead of general anesthesia

TARE with Yttrium-90 is an advanced treatment that is invaluable for patients with primary and secondary malignancies of the liver who have previously exhausted or who do not have other options in combating their liver cancer.

How TARE with Yttrium-90 Works

Tumors need a blood supply, which they actively generate, to feed themselves and grow. Interventional radiologists are uniquely skilled in using the vascular system to deliver targeted treatments via catheter throughout the body. In treating cancer patients, Interventional Radiologists can attack the tumor from inside the body without medicating or affecting other parts of the body.

Combining the radioactive isotope Yttrium-90 (also known as Y-90) into microspheres to deliver radiation directly to a tumor allows for a higher, local dose of radiation to be used-without subjecting healthy tissue in the body to the radiation.

 trans arterial radioembolization Northern Westchester HospitalEach microsphere is about the size of five red blood cells in width. These beads are injected through a catheter from the groin into the liver artery supplying the tumor. The beads become lodged within the tumor vessels where they exert their local radiation that kills the cancer cells. Y-90 radiates from within and is administered via the hepatic artery. Y-90 treatment is approved by the Food and Drug Administration for the treatment of inoperable liver cancer and metastatic colorectal cancer in the liver.

While this advanced treatment doesn’t cure liver cancer, the lives of patients at NWH are being extended and their quality of life is improved with Yttrium-90 microsphere treatment.

The Team Approach at NWH

Paramount to the application of this leading-edge treatment is the multidisciplinary collaboration at Northern Westchester Hospital between the Interventional Radiology Department and the Radiation Oncology Department, led by Dr. Alfred Tinger, Chief of Radiation Oncology in The Cancer Treatment and Wellness Center.

There are other interventional radiology treatments available at Northern Westchester Hospital that are used to treat primary liver cancer, as well as other cancers that have metastasized in the liver, such as colorectal cancer, breast cancer, gynecologic cancers, melanoma, and others. These nonsurgical interventional radiology treatments are:

  • Trans arterial embolization (TAE)
  • Trans arterial chemoembolization (TACE), which delivers chemotherapy directly to the liver
  • Radiofrequency ablation (RFA), which kills the tumor with heat to treat the cancer locally.

Editor’s Note:  Carlos Forcade, MD, is Director of Interventional Radiology at Northern Westchester Hospital in Mt. Kisco, NY.  For more information or for a referral please call the Interventional Radiology Department at 914.242.8154

NWH is one of only 5 Hospitals in New York State to offer Yttrium-90 therapy for the treatment of liver cancer. (The other hospitals are: Memorial Sloane-Kettering, NYU, Mt. Sinai and NY Presbyterian.)

Northern Westchester Hospital Chief of Dermatology Talks Skin Cancer and Melanoma

Posted on: July 31, 2014

Melanoma: The black sheep of the family

By Dr. Ross Levy

Of the three common types of skin cancer, melanoma is the most worrisome. This aggressive cancer is deadly when caught late. Skin cancer in general is on the rise: Fifty years ago, one in 2000 people developed a melanoma. Now it’s one in 35. By gaining a better understanding of melanoma and its causes, you remove some of the scare and can protect yourself. Continue reading

Northern Westchester Hospital Chief of Pediatrics Discusses New Vaccination Requirements in New York

Posted on: July 22, 2014

Back-to-School Preparations May Need to Include Vaccinations
By Dr. Pete Richel

Your child may need a new vaccination before classes start this fall. For the first time in more than a decade, New York State has updated its school immunization requirements, and now children must be vaccinated twice against varicella—chicken pox.

Image courtesy of Sura Nualpradid / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Image courtesy of Sura Nualpradid / FreeDigitalPhotos.net

Prior to July of this year, parents could opt out of the second chicken pox vaccine. Why the shift? After all, many adults may remember chicken pox parties from their youth: Mothers would take children to visit a sick kid so that their children would be exposed, get ill, and gain immunity. Although chicken pox can be relatively mild, it can also cause permanent scarring and in some cases turn deadly. As recently as 10 years ago—before use of the vaccine was widespread—the US had as many as 100 deaths a year from chicken pox. From a public health perspective and from mine as a doctor, one death is too many. If we can eliminate this risk, we should seize that opportunity.

There have been some other minor changes to the immunization requirements, such as stipulating a schedule of three to five polio vaccinations before starting school. This has to do with timing. If your child has received the required three polio vaccines in infancy, they must still receive one at the time of school entrance. Three are required, and four are recommended for complete immunization. In either case, one must be received between the ages of 4 and 6. The new requirements—which will be phased in over the next seven years—apply to students starting daycare, Head Start, nursery, pre-kindergarten, and grades kindergarten through 12. If you’ve already taken your children for their wellness visit and vaccinations—or you’re not sure if your child is vaccinated against chicken pox—contact your pediatrician.

Editor’s Note: Dr. Peter Richel, MD, FAAP is Chief of Pediatrics at Northern Westchester Hospital.

Northern Westchester Hospital Dietitian Shares the Benefits of Berries

Posted on: July 22, 2014

Benefits of Berries
By Stephanie Perruzza

 

Berries are delicious and nutritious, packing a tasty and powerful punch in every bite.  They contain large amounts of antioxidants important in protecting against chronic disease; they are also low in calories!  Enjoy them fresh or frozen in your favorite dishes. Continue reading