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Northern Westchester Hospital Maternity Nurse Talks Birth Plans

Posted on: May 27, 2014

Making it Your Birth Experience

By RoseMary Stevens, RNC-OB, Northern Westchester Hospital

birth_planA Birth Plan is a document that tells your health care provider and the hospital staff what kind of childbirth experience you would like to have and how you would like your newborn cared for. Continue reading

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Westchester Chief of Plastic Surgery on Exciting and Empowering Results for Women of Study by NWH Breast Surgeons Published in AJCS

Posted on: April 29, 2014

Empowering Results of New Research on Esthetic Outcomes of Breast Reconstruction

By Dr. Michael H. Rosenberg, FACS, Chief of Plastic Surgery, Vice-President for Physician Surgical Services and Associate Medical Director at Northern Westchester Hospital

TheBreastInst_door_HiRezMy colleagues at Northern Westchester Hospital and I recently published research findings on breast reconstruction outcomes that have the potential to dramatically improve quality of life after breast surgery as well as to save women’s lives. Published in The American Journal of Cosmetic Surgery, our article was titled “Breast Reconstruction With or Without Human Acellular Dermal Matrices:

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Northern Westchester Hospital Dietitian Discusses the Role of Food in Cancer Prevention

Posted on: April 22, 2014

The Shopping Basket: A Tool To Control Your Cancer Risk

By Stephanie Perruzza MS, RD, CDN

picnic-basketAs a dietitian, I am keenly aware of the impact that food and nutrition have on health and well-being, and I am truly passionate about educating others in this aspect. What you eat can also impact your cancer risk. Many of us have been affected by cancer in some way, and it’s empowering to know that eating a well-balanced diet with an emphasis on plant foods is one thing that you can do to help reduce your risk – and it’s easy to do, just grab a shopping basket.

Research shows that 1 in every 3 cancers is linked to poor diet and lack of physical activity. The guidelines for reducing your cancer risk are similar to that of reducing other chronic diseases.
1.    Fruits and vegetables. This includes non-starchy vegetables and the more variety the better to ensure you are getting an array of vitamins and antioxidants. Good options include tomatoes, beets, broccoli, dark leafy greens like spinach, kale, as well as berries, grapes, and citrus fruits like grapefruit and oranges. “Eat the rainbow” every day and you’ll be sure to get a wide variety in your diet!
2.    Fiber-rich foods. In addition to fruits and vegetables, whole grains such as whole wheat breads or pastas, oatmeal, barley, brown rice to name a few contain ample amounts of fiber.  Beans and legumes are also a great source of fiber.
3.    Choose lean protein. Select chicken, fish, eggs and vegetable protein sources such as beans, legumes and unsalted nuts when possible. Limit your intake of red meats and if you do consume, choose leaner cuts that include the words “loin” or “round” and have smaller portions.
4.    Avoid saturated and trans fats. Full-fat dairy, cheese and processed food items like luncheon meats, bacon, sausage and snack foods contain saturated fats. When reading food labels look for and avoid partially-hydrogenated oil on the ingredient list.
5.    Limit sodium. Canned products such as soups and vegetables are often high in sodium. Look for low-sodium soup varieties, and rinsing canned vegetables before use can reduce the sodium content by about 40%.

In addition to focusing on diet, there are a few other factors to keep in mind:
•    Maintain a healthy weight. You have a higher risk for cancer if you are overweight or obese. Together, engaging in regular exercise and making healthy food choices can help with weight control.
•    Limit Alcohol. Studies have shown that consuming alcohol in excess can increase your risk of certain types of cancers. Limit your intake to no more than one alcoholic beverage per day for women and two per day for men, preferably with a meal.
•    Exercise Regularly. Aim to get 30 minutes each day or 150 minutes of moderate physical activity each week as a general goal.
•    Avoid Tobacco. Smoking and chewing tobacco has been linked to various types of cancer specifically oral cavity and lung. Talk to your doctor about ways to quit.

Editor’s Note: Nutrition consultation is also part of Northern Westchester Hospital’s Health & Wellness Program. The Health and Wellness Program is designed to support our patients in parallel to their medical treatment plan after they receive a diagnosis of cancer. Patients of NWH physicians have access to the Program at no charge.

Sleep Expert at Northern Westchester Hospital Explains Sleep Apnea, Symptoms, Dangers, and Treatment Options

Posted on: April 22, 2014

Sleep Apnea: Symptoms, Dangers, and Treatment Options

By Dr. Praveen Rudraraju, Director of the Center for Sleep Medicine at Northern Westchester Hospital

What is sleep apnea?
Sleep apnea (AP-ne-ah) is a common disorder where you have one or more pauses in breathing or shallow breaths while you sleep.

What are the signs of sleep apnea?
Most people who have sleep apnea don’t know they have it because it only occurs during sleep. A family member or bed partner might be the first to notice signs of sleep apnea. The most common symptoms are snoring and daytime sleepiness. But these symptoms may not be seen in everyone, which delays diagnosis in most people. Other symptoms that are seen in sleep apnea are non-restorative sleep, morning headaches, nocturia (urinating multiple times at night), and insomnia. One or more symptoms may be present in most patients. There are some people with no symptoms. Continue reading

New York Cardiology Chief on Controlling Cholesterol and Reducing Risk of Cardiovascular Disease

Posted on: April 21, 2014

How to take control of your cholesterol levels…starting today!
(part 3 of 3)

By Dr. Robert Pilchik, Chief of Cardiology at Northern Westchester Hospital

What’s the best way to bring your HDL and LDL cholesterol levels into the safe zone, and significantly reduce your risk of cardiovascular disease? On your own. That’s right – through diet and exercise. And if you’re a smoker, quitting is a must.

You may be amazed how effective lifestyle changes are in lowering “bad” LDL cholesterol and raising “good” HDL cholesterol, and how fast you can achieve your goal.  (For more information on LDL and HDL cholesterol, read Parts One and Two of this series.) In three to four months, diet and exercise alone can produce more than a 30 percent reduction in LDL cholesterol, which is often enough to put you into the safe zone. What’s more, exercise is the only way to raise HDL cholesterol (which vacuums artery-blocking LDL cholesterol from your body). Continue reading