American Diabetes Association Publishes New Nutrition Guidelines

Posted on: November 19, 2014

Healthful Eating

By Jill Ashbey-Pejoves

Earlier this year, the American Diabetes Association published new nutrition guidelines for people with diabetes. The ADA reviewed the available research on nutrition in diabetes and found that, when it comes to diet and diabetes, one size does not fit all.

According to the guidelines, the goals of nutrition therapy for adults with diabetes are “to promote and support healthful eating patterns, emphasizing a variety of nutrient dense foods in ap-propriate portion sizes in order to improve overall health.” Here are some highlights of changes to the ADA guidelines:

1. For good health, carbohydrate intake should come from vegetables, fruits, whole grains, legumes and low-fat dairy products, rather than carbohydrate sources containing added fats, sugars or sodium.
2. There is no minimum amount of carbohydrate necessary, the amount of carbohydrate, protein and fat in the diet should be based on the nutritional, metabolic and weight con-siderations of the individual.
3. Sugar (sucrose) consumption should be kept to a minimum in order to allow for more nu-tritious foods.
4. Sugar-sweetened beverages should be avoided all together, and may be replaced with diet beverages if desired.
5. People with diabetes should follow the same recommendations for intake of saturated fat, cholesterol, trans fat, and sodium as the general public:

Saturated fat <10% of total calories
Cholesterol <300mg per day
Avoid trans fat
Sodium <2300mg per day

6. Individuals who are overweight or obese should aim for modest weight loss (greater than or equal to 7% of their starting weight).
7. Nutrition counseling, preferably provided by a Registered Dietitian familiar with the com-ponents of diabetes nutrition therapy, is an important tool to help people with diabetes achieve their treatment goals.

The needs of the individual and the importance of honoring personal tastes and cultural prefer-ences are influential in encouraging people with diabetes to follow a healthful diet and lifestyle.

Try these healthy, delicious recipes:

Mini Crab Cakes with Dill Mayonnaise
Courtesy of Weight Watchers Simply Delicious

Ingredients
1 pound cooked jumbo lump crabmeat
1/4 c. plain dry bread crumbs
1/2 c. reduced-calorie mayonnaise
1/4 c. grated onion
4 tsp Dijon mustard
1 egg white
4 drops hot pepper sauce
1/2 c. cornflake crumbs
1/4 c. sweet pickle relish
2 Tbsp chopped dill
1 Tbsp canola oil

Method
1. Combine the crabmeat, bread crumbs, 1/4 cup of the mayonnaise, onion, 3 teaspoons of mustard, egg white, and hot pepper sauce in a bowl. Form into 14 patties.
2. Place the cornflake crumbs on wax paper. Dredge the patties in the crumbs, transfer to a plate, and refrigerate, covered, for 30 minutes
3. Combine remaining 1/4 cup mayonnaise, relish, dill and mustard in small bowl.
4. Heat oil in a large nonstick skillet. Add the patties a few at a time; cook until crisp and golden, about 3 minutes. Flip and cook 2-3 minutes more. Serve with the mayonnaise mixture.

Calories: 94; Fat: 5g; Sat Fat: 1g; Sodium: 252mg; Carbohydrate: 6g; Protein: 7g

Ginger-Spiced Pumpkin Pie
Courtesy of Diabetes Self-Management Magazine

Ingredients
1 c. finely crushed gingersnap cookies
1/4 c. margarine or butter, melted
2 large egg whites
3/4 c. packed light brown sugar
1 can (15 ounces) solid-pack pumpkin
1 c. canned evaporated skimmed milk
1 tsp vanilla
1 tsp ground ginger
1 tsp ground cinnamon
1/2 tsp salt

Method
1. Combine crushed cookies and margarine/butter in medium bowl; mix well. Press onto bot-tom and up sides of a 9-inch, deep-dish pie plate. Refrigerate 30 minutes.
2. Preheat oven to 350 degrees F. Beat egg whites and brown sugar in large bowl. Add pump-kin, milk, vanilla, cinnamon, ginger and salt; mix well. Pour into crust.
3. Bake 60-70 minutes or until center is set. Transfer pie to wire rack; cool 30 minutes. Serve warm or at room temperature.

Serves 8
Calories: 230, Fat: 7g, Sat Fat: 1g, Sodium: 355mg; Carbohydrate: 38g; Protein: 5g.

Editor’s Note: Jill Ashbey-Pejoves RD, CDE, CDN is a Registered Dietitian at Northern Westchester Hospital.

The Center for Diabetes at Northern Westchester Hospital is dedicated to providing a wide range of services and programs for people with diabetes. In addition to supporting the needs of inpatients, the Center offers a comprehensive outpatient education program that focuses on meeting the individual needs of persons living with diabetes and their families. The Center also sponsors a monthly diabetes support group for adult patients. For more information on any of our Diabetes programs, call 914.666.1861.

The National Diabetes Education Program (NDEP) and its partners want you to know that if you have diabetes, you are at greater risk for heart disease. Lower that risk by managing the diabetes ABCs: the A1C test, Blood Pressure, Cholesterol and Stop Smoking. Learn how to control the ABCs of Diabetes.